How Healthy Families Weather Hard Times

Reviewed Mar 22, 2017

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Summary

  • Lean on each other for support.
  • Work together.
  • Visualize a future with hope.

Why is it that some families seem to cope with the worst things that life dishes out, while others seem to unravel at the first sign of trouble? In a word, the answer is resilience.

Resilience refers to internal strength and durability. When times are tough, healthy families survive by adapting to events. Resilient families share these traits:

  • Cohesiveness
  • Adaptability
  • Creativity (in solving problems)
  • Hope

Cohesiveness

Cohesive families have emotional closeness that enables them to cope with hardship. Children in these families trust that their parents will protect them, provide for them, and guide them through any circumstances they come across. In cohesive families, partners lean on each other for support and work together to find solutions. When trouble comes, they talk about it and give each other support and comfort.

Adaptability

Adaptable families are able to change as their circumstances change, with little distress. Adaptable families understand that change is part of life. They are able to keep their focus on what needs to be done next. For example, they may take on a part-time job to increase cash flow if extra money is needed. Healthy families make these choices together and share the burden.

Creativity

Thinking of new ways to get things done with less can turn a bad situation into an adventure. For example, when cutting back on eating out or on entertainment, creative families find alternatives. Instead of going out for pizza and a movie, they might have a make-your-own-pizza and movie night at home.

Hope

Losing hope during hard times often signals the beginning of the end. When hope is lost, we tend to throw in the towel. Resilient families are known for their sense of hope, and for even “out hoping” others. One reason is that they always find things they can control when other things are tilting out of control.

When Joann’s 79-year-old father was dying of lung cancer, there was little the family could do to stop it. However, they decided that there was plenty they could do to keep the illness from robbing them of the time they had left. They planned parties and family celebrations to commemorate his life. Because he did not want to be in the hospital until the end, the adult grandchildren took turns sleeping at his home to give support to their grandmother. Although they accepted that his death was not in their hands, they never gave up hope that his last days could be filled with joy.

Resilience can be learned

Resilience can be learned over time. You can learn from observing resilient families and asking how they respond to hard times. You can also take steps to nurture resilience in yourself and your family by having a hopeful outlook, keeping things in perspective, looking for chances for self-discovery, and accepting that change is a part of life.

By Drew W. Edwards, EdD, MS

Summary

  • Lean on each other for support.
  • Work together.
  • Visualize a future with hope.

Why is it that some families seem to cope with the worst things that life dishes out, while others seem to unravel at the first sign of trouble? In a word, the answer is resilience.

Resilience refers to internal strength and durability. When times are tough, healthy families survive by adapting to events. Resilient families share these traits:

  • Cohesiveness
  • Adaptability
  • Creativity (in solving problems)
  • Hope

Cohesiveness

Cohesive families have emotional closeness that enables them to cope with hardship. Children in these families trust that their parents will protect them, provide for them, and guide them through any circumstances they come across. In cohesive families, partners lean on each other for support and work together to find solutions. When trouble comes, they talk about it and give each other support and comfort.

Adaptability

Adaptable families are able to change as their circumstances change, with little distress. Adaptable families understand that change is part of life. They are able to keep their focus on what needs to be done next. For example, they may take on a part-time job to increase cash flow if extra money is needed. Healthy families make these choices together and share the burden.

Creativity

Thinking of new ways to get things done with less can turn a bad situation into an adventure. For example, when cutting back on eating out or on entertainment, creative families find alternatives. Instead of going out for pizza and a movie, they might have a make-your-own-pizza and movie night at home.

Hope

Losing hope during hard times often signals the beginning of the end. When hope is lost, we tend to throw in the towel. Resilient families are known for their sense of hope, and for even “out hoping” others. One reason is that they always find things they can control when other things are tilting out of control.

When Joann’s 79-year-old father was dying of lung cancer, there was little the family could do to stop it. However, they decided that there was plenty they could do to keep the illness from robbing them of the time they had left. They planned parties and family celebrations to commemorate his life. Because he did not want to be in the hospital until the end, the adult grandchildren took turns sleeping at his home to give support to their grandmother. Although they accepted that his death was not in their hands, they never gave up hope that his last days could be filled with joy.

Resilience can be learned

Resilience can be learned over time. You can learn from observing resilient families and asking how they respond to hard times. You can also take steps to nurture resilience in yourself and your family by having a hopeful outlook, keeping things in perspective, looking for chances for self-discovery, and accepting that change is a part of life.

By Drew W. Edwards, EdD, MS

Summary

  • Lean on each other for support.
  • Work together.
  • Visualize a future with hope.

Why is it that some families seem to cope with the worst things that life dishes out, while others seem to unravel at the first sign of trouble? In a word, the answer is resilience.

Resilience refers to internal strength and durability. When times are tough, healthy families survive by adapting to events. Resilient families share these traits:

  • Cohesiveness
  • Adaptability
  • Creativity (in solving problems)
  • Hope

Cohesiveness

Cohesive families have emotional closeness that enables them to cope with hardship. Children in these families trust that their parents will protect them, provide for them, and guide them through any circumstances they come across. In cohesive families, partners lean on each other for support and work together to find solutions. When trouble comes, they talk about it and give each other support and comfort.

Adaptability

Adaptable families are able to change as their circumstances change, with little distress. Adaptable families understand that change is part of life. They are able to keep their focus on what needs to be done next. For example, they may take on a part-time job to increase cash flow if extra money is needed. Healthy families make these choices together and share the burden.

Creativity

Thinking of new ways to get things done with less can turn a bad situation into an adventure. For example, when cutting back on eating out or on entertainment, creative families find alternatives. Instead of going out for pizza and a movie, they might have a make-your-own-pizza and movie night at home.

Hope

Losing hope during hard times often signals the beginning of the end. When hope is lost, we tend to throw in the towel. Resilient families are known for their sense of hope, and for even “out hoping” others. One reason is that they always find things they can control when other things are tilting out of control.

When Joann’s 79-year-old father was dying of lung cancer, there was little the family could do to stop it. However, they decided that there was plenty they could do to keep the illness from robbing them of the time they had left. They planned parties and family celebrations to commemorate his life. Because he did not want to be in the hospital until the end, the adult grandchildren took turns sleeping at his home to give support to their grandmother. Although they accepted that his death was not in their hands, they never gave up hope that his last days could be filled with joy.

Resilience can be learned

Resilience can be learned over time. You can learn from observing resilient families and asking how they respond to hard times. You can also take steps to nurture resilience in yourself and your family by having a hopeful outlook, keeping things in perspective, looking for chances for self-discovery, and accepting that change is a part of life.

By Drew W. Edwards, EdD, MS

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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