How to Create Your Own Crisis Plan

Reviewed Aug 30, 2016

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Summary

A crisis plan covers:

  • Who I am
  • What I need
  • How I want people to help me, in a crisis

Life is full of surprises. You can have a good day on Monday and a terrible day on Tuesday. This can be even more likely if you’re having problems with your mental health.

It’s a good idea to plan for a crisis by putting important info in one place so you can pull it out and read it. Or you can hand it to someone else.

Here is a basic outline for a crisis plan that can help someone help you if you find yourself in trouble. Change it any way you like to make it work for you, but try to keep some of the same info in your plan.

You might want to leave one copy at home, and carry another copy with you when you go out. Take it with you if you’re meeting with a crisis team or hospital staff.

Name:

Address:                                                                                       

Phone #:

Birth date: 

Gender:   

Who to Contact in an Emergency:
Name
Address
Phone
Relationship to you

Health needs:

Chronic health conditions, if any:

Nearest cross streets to your home:

Your health care and service providers:

Pets:

Children:

Describe what a crisis is to you.

In the past, what has helped you when you were in a crisis?

How do you act or what do you look like when you are having a hard time?

Are there things you do that might frighten other people?

How do you want them to react? 

Is there anything else you want people to know about you, so they can help you when you’re having a hard time?

Resource

Mental Health America
www.nmha.org

By Paula Hartman Cohen
Source: Maine Department of Health and Human Services, www.maine.gov/dhhs/mh/rights-legal/crisis-plan/home.html
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, CRSS, Recovery Team Manager and Julie Tull, CRSS, Peer & Family Support Specialist, Beacon Health Options

Summary

A crisis plan covers:

  • Who I am
  • What I need
  • How I want people to help me, in a crisis

Life is full of surprises. You can have a good day on Monday and a terrible day on Tuesday. This can be even more likely if you’re having problems with your mental health.

It’s a good idea to plan for a crisis by putting important info in one place so you can pull it out and read it. Or you can hand it to someone else.

Here is a basic outline for a crisis plan that can help someone help you if you find yourself in trouble. Change it any way you like to make it work for you, but try to keep some of the same info in your plan.

You might want to leave one copy at home, and carry another copy with you when you go out. Take it with you if you’re meeting with a crisis team or hospital staff.

Name:

Address:                                                                                       

Phone #:

Birth date: 

Gender:   

Who to Contact in an Emergency:
Name
Address
Phone
Relationship to you

Health needs:

Chronic health conditions, if any:

Nearest cross streets to your home:

Your health care and service providers:

Pets:

Children:

Describe what a crisis is to you.

In the past, what has helped you when you were in a crisis?

How do you act or what do you look like when you are having a hard time?

Are there things you do that might frighten other people?

How do you want them to react? 

Is there anything else you want people to know about you, so they can help you when you’re having a hard time?

Resource

Mental Health America
www.nmha.org

By Paula Hartman Cohen
Source: Maine Department of Health and Human Services, www.maine.gov/dhhs/mh/rights-legal/crisis-plan/home.html
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, CRSS, Recovery Team Manager and Julie Tull, CRSS, Peer & Family Support Specialist, Beacon Health Options

Summary

A crisis plan covers:

  • Who I am
  • What I need
  • How I want people to help me, in a crisis

Life is full of surprises. You can have a good day on Monday and a terrible day on Tuesday. This can be even more likely if you’re having problems with your mental health.

It’s a good idea to plan for a crisis by putting important info in one place so you can pull it out and read it. Or you can hand it to someone else.

Here is a basic outline for a crisis plan that can help someone help you if you find yourself in trouble. Change it any way you like to make it work for you, but try to keep some of the same info in your plan.

You might want to leave one copy at home, and carry another copy with you when you go out. Take it with you if you’re meeting with a crisis team or hospital staff.

Name:

Address:                                                                                       

Phone #:

Birth date: 

Gender:   

Who to Contact in an Emergency:
Name
Address
Phone
Relationship to you

Health needs:

Chronic health conditions, if any:

Nearest cross streets to your home:

Your health care and service providers:

Pets:

Children:

Describe what a crisis is to you.

In the past, what has helped you when you were in a crisis?

How do you act or what do you look like when you are having a hard time?

Are there things you do that might frighten other people?

How do you want them to react? 

Is there anything else you want people to know about you, so they can help you when you’re having a hard time?

Resource

Mental Health America
www.nmha.org

By Paula Hartman Cohen
Source: Maine Department of Health and Human Services, www.maine.gov/dhhs/mh/rights-legal/crisis-plan/home.html
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, CRSS, Recovery Team Manager and Julie Tull, CRSS, Peer & Family Support Specialist, Beacon Health Options

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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