Give Peace a Chance: Making Your Home a Peaceful Haven

Reviewed Oct 10, 2017

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Summary

  • Identify your needs.
  • Evaluate your space.
  • Examine your resources.
  • Establish house rules.

It’s a crazy world out there, and no one is immune to the stress caused by jobs, traffic, crowds, details, family…the list is endless. One sure way to combat the damaging effects of everyday stress is to create a welcoming haven of peace at home where you can close the door on the big, bad world and nurture your battered soul. Try some of these techniques to help you de-stress and relax in tranquil surroundings.

Identify your needs

Take some time to look at yourself to see what kind of person you really are right now; times change, people change, and needs change. What is important to you? Who is important? Which needs are not being met? If you live with others, consider their needs as well.

Evaluate your space

Take a serious inventory of how your living space affects you. Armed with paper and pen, tour your home with new awareness. What assaults your senses? What is pleasing? What offends you? Consider these sensory effects:

  • Vision. Color can affect moods a great deal, so notice what surrounds you. Do you need the calming effects of blues, greens, and pastels, or do you need the pick-me-up of yellow and red? Is there enough sunlight or too much? How about style? Some people feel comforted among knickknacks, while others are overwhelmed or irritated by clutter. Pay attention to how your body responds to your environment.
  • Sound. Sometimes you are surrounded by sounds that you don’t realize cause you stress. Listen carefully. Do traffic noises or factory sounds irritate you? Are children screaming in the kitchen? Is it too quiet? What would you prefer to hear?
  • Smell. Psychologically our noses can trigger more vivid memories and intense emotion than other senses. Can you smell last night’s lasagna? The cat’s litter box? Your husband’s cologne? Which smells feel good for you?
  • Touch. Maybe everything looks and smells OK, but every time you sit on your couch it makes you itch, or perhaps that lump under the center cushion bugs you. Even textures are important.

Examine your resources

So, how can you get what you need to relax? Systematically go about making the changes you can, by rearranging, repainting, and redesigning. If you need help, hire an expert, check out bookstores, libraries, or websites for information on decorating or feng shui (the Chinese art of energy and enlightenment) or ask friends whose homes are cozy for decorating advice. It does not have to mean a huge expense; sometimes a gallon of paint, a blanket draped over the couch ,and playing a recording of ocean sounds can work wonders.

Establish house rules

Whether you live with roommates or with family, home does not mean a free-for-all. Consider the needs of all of your housemates, because good relationships and respect for others go a very long way toward peace. A household meeting may be necessary to sort out requirements, schedules, and priorities. For example, if Dad needs 30 minutes alone at 5:30, make it a firm family rule that 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. is “quiet hour.” If shopping or pet chores have become a burden for one person, learn how to share it. Don’t be afraid to reset rules when things change.

Your home should be a safe and comfortable place, where all inhabitants can feel free enough to relax, be creative, hide from the world, and just enjoy being. If you take the time to see what the priorities and problems are, you can create a home that meets all members’ visions of peace. 

By Allyson Johns
Source: Design It Yourself/Do It Yourself, www.diyonline.com

Summary

  • Identify your needs.
  • Evaluate your space.
  • Examine your resources.
  • Establish house rules.

It’s a crazy world out there, and no one is immune to the stress caused by jobs, traffic, crowds, details, family…the list is endless. One sure way to combat the damaging effects of everyday stress is to create a welcoming haven of peace at home where you can close the door on the big, bad world and nurture your battered soul. Try some of these techniques to help you de-stress and relax in tranquil surroundings.

Identify your needs

Take some time to look at yourself to see what kind of person you really are right now; times change, people change, and needs change. What is important to you? Who is important? Which needs are not being met? If you live with others, consider their needs as well.

Evaluate your space

Take a serious inventory of how your living space affects you. Armed with paper and pen, tour your home with new awareness. What assaults your senses? What is pleasing? What offends you? Consider these sensory effects:

  • Vision. Color can affect moods a great deal, so notice what surrounds you. Do you need the calming effects of blues, greens, and pastels, or do you need the pick-me-up of yellow and red? Is there enough sunlight or too much? How about style? Some people feel comforted among knickknacks, while others are overwhelmed or irritated by clutter. Pay attention to how your body responds to your environment.
  • Sound. Sometimes you are surrounded by sounds that you don’t realize cause you stress. Listen carefully. Do traffic noises or factory sounds irritate you? Are children screaming in the kitchen? Is it too quiet? What would you prefer to hear?
  • Smell. Psychologically our noses can trigger more vivid memories and intense emotion than other senses. Can you smell last night’s lasagna? The cat’s litter box? Your husband’s cologne? Which smells feel good for you?
  • Touch. Maybe everything looks and smells OK, but every time you sit on your couch it makes you itch, or perhaps that lump under the center cushion bugs you. Even textures are important.

Examine your resources

So, how can you get what you need to relax? Systematically go about making the changes you can, by rearranging, repainting, and redesigning. If you need help, hire an expert, check out bookstores, libraries, or websites for information on decorating or feng shui (the Chinese art of energy and enlightenment) or ask friends whose homes are cozy for decorating advice. It does not have to mean a huge expense; sometimes a gallon of paint, a blanket draped over the couch ,and playing a recording of ocean sounds can work wonders.

Establish house rules

Whether you live with roommates or with family, home does not mean a free-for-all. Consider the needs of all of your housemates, because good relationships and respect for others go a very long way toward peace. A household meeting may be necessary to sort out requirements, schedules, and priorities. For example, if Dad needs 30 minutes alone at 5:30, make it a firm family rule that 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. is “quiet hour.” If shopping or pet chores have become a burden for one person, learn how to share it. Don’t be afraid to reset rules when things change.

Your home should be a safe and comfortable place, where all inhabitants can feel free enough to relax, be creative, hide from the world, and just enjoy being. If you take the time to see what the priorities and problems are, you can create a home that meets all members’ visions of peace. 

By Allyson Johns
Source: Design It Yourself/Do It Yourself, www.diyonline.com

Summary

  • Identify your needs.
  • Evaluate your space.
  • Examine your resources.
  • Establish house rules.

It’s a crazy world out there, and no one is immune to the stress caused by jobs, traffic, crowds, details, family…the list is endless. One sure way to combat the damaging effects of everyday stress is to create a welcoming haven of peace at home where you can close the door on the big, bad world and nurture your battered soul. Try some of these techniques to help you de-stress and relax in tranquil surroundings.

Identify your needs

Take some time to look at yourself to see what kind of person you really are right now; times change, people change, and needs change. What is important to you? Who is important? Which needs are not being met? If you live with others, consider their needs as well.

Evaluate your space

Take a serious inventory of how your living space affects you. Armed with paper and pen, tour your home with new awareness. What assaults your senses? What is pleasing? What offends you? Consider these sensory effects:

  • Vision. Color can affect moods a great deal, so notice what surrounds you. Do you need the calming effects of blues, greens, and pastels, or do you need the pick-me-up of yellow and red? Is there enough sunlight or too much? How about style? Some people feel comforted among knickknacks, while others are overwhelmed or irritated by clutter. Pay attention to how your body responds to your environment.
  • Sound. Sometimes you are surrounded by sounds that you don’t realize cause you stress. Listen carefully. Do traffic noises or factory sounds irritate you? Are children screaming in the kitchen? Is it too quiet? What would you prefer to hear?
  • Smell. Psychologically our noses can trigger more vivid memories and intense emotion than other senses. Can you smell last night’s lasagna? The cat’s litter box? Your husband’s cologne? Which smells feel good for you?
  • Touch. Maybe everything looks and smells OK, but every time you sit on your couch it makes you itch, or perhaps that lump under the center cushion bugs you. Even textures are important.

Examine your resources

So, how can you get what you need to relax? Systematically go about making the changes you can, by rearranging, repainting, and redesigning. If you need help, hire an expert, check out bookstores, libraries, or websites for information on decorating or feng shui (the Chinese art of energy and enlightenment) or ask friends whose homes are cozy for decorating advice. It does not have to mean a huge expense; sometimes a gallon of paint, a blanket draped over the couch ,and playing a recording of ocean sounds can work wonders.

Establish house rules

Whether you live with roommates or with family, home does not mean a free-for-all. Consider the needs of all of your housemates, because good relationships and respect for others go a very long way toward peace. A household meeting may be necessary to sort out requirements, schedules, and priorities. For example, if Dad needs 30 minutes alone at 5:30, make it a firm family rule that 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. is “quiet hour.” If shopping or pet chores have become a burden for one person, learn how to share it. Don’t be afraid to reset rules when things change.

Your home should be a safe and comfortable place, where all inhabitants can feel free enough to relax, be creative, hide from the world, and just enjoy being. If you take the time to see what the priorities and problems are, you can create a home that meets all members’ visions of peace. 

By Allyson Johns
Source: Design It Yourself/Do It Yourself, www.diyonline.com

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