Adult Illicit Drug Users Are Far More Likely to Seriously Consider Suicide

Posted Jan 21, 2014

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Adults using illicit drugs are far more likely to seriously consider suicide than the general adult population according to a new report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The report finds that 3.9 percent of the nation’s adult population aged 18 or older had serious thoughts about suicide in the past year, but that the rate among adult illicit drug users was 9.4 percent.

Suicidal thought rates vary by substance

According to SAMHSA’s report, the percentage of adults that had serious thoughts of suicide varied by the type of illicit substance used. For example, while 9.6 percent of adults that had used marijuana in the past year had serious thoughts of suicide during that period, the level was 20.9 percent for adults that had used sedatives non-medically in the past year.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Those in crisis or that know someone they believe may be at immediate risk of attempting suicide are urged to call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or go to http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org. The Suicide Prevention Lifeline network, funded by SAMHSA, provides immediate free and confidential, round-the-clock crisis counseling to anyone in need throughout the country, every day of the year.

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, http://www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/advisories/1401154912.aspx

Adults using illicit drugs are far more likely to seriously consider suicide than the general adult population according to a new report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The report finds that 3.9 percent of the nation’s adult population aged 18 or older had serious thoughts about suicide in the past year, but that the rate among adult illicit drug users was 9.4 percent.

Suicidal thought rates vary by substance

According to SAMHSA’s report, the percentage of adults that had serious thoughts of suicide varied by the type of illicit substance used. For example, while 9.6 percent of adults that had used marijuana in the past year had serious thoughts of suicide during that period, the level was 20.9 percent for adults that had used sedatives non-medically in the past year.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Those in crisis or that know someone they believe may be at immediate risk of attempting suicide are urged to call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or go to http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org. The Suicide Prevention Lifeline network, funded by SAMHSA, provides immediate free and confidential, round-the-clock crisis counseling to anyone in need throughout the country, every day of the year.

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, http://www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/advisories/1401154912.aspx

Adults using illicit drugs are far more likely to seriously consider suicide than the general adult population according to a new report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The report finds that 3.9 percent of the nation’s adult population aged 18 or older had serious thoughts about suicide in the past year, but that the rate among adult illicit drug users was 9.4 percent.

Suicidal thought rates vary by substance

According to SAMHSA’s report, the percentage of adults that had serious thoughts of suicide varied by the type of illicit substance used. For example, while 9.6 percent of adults that had used marijuana in the past year had serious thoughts of suicide during that period, the level was 20.9 percent for adults that had used sedatives non-medically in the past year.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Those in crisis or that know someone they believe may be at immediate risk of attempting suicide are urged to call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or go to http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org. The Suicide Prevention Lifeline network, funded by SAMHSA, provides immediate free and confidential, round-the-clock crisis counseling to anyone in need throughout the country, every day of the year.

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, http://www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/advisories/1401154912.aspx

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