Writing a Personal Mission Statement

Reviewed Aug 26, 2016

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Summary

  • Reserve time for soul-searching and reflection.
  • A statement of ideals and priorities, of meaning and purpose.
  • Ongoing reminder of the life you want to lead.

Many businesses create corporate mission statements that clearly express the organization’s values and goals. These declarations may be useful at the office, but many people also have benefited from writing personal mission statements. Since a personal mission statement is unique to you, there is no formula. If, however, you are feeling uncertain about your relationships, career, values or goals, then writing a personal mission statement may be the best way to clarify your beliefs and direction.  

Take time to reflect

You probably won’t sit down and write your statement in an afternoon. The process of discovering your personal mission is as important as the statement itself. Try to reserve some time for soul-searching and reflection. A personal mission statement usually is a statement of ideals and priorities, of meaning and purpose. This may seem like a tall order, but you probably already know what’s most important to you.

A personal mission statement can serve as an ongoing reminder of the life you want to lead. Your statement may help you make difficult decisions and serve as a guide in the future. Though every personal mission statement is different, here are some suggestions for getting started:

  • Find some peace and quiet. Don’t try to create your personal mission statement when you’re busy and distracted. You’ll probably need some privacy, as well as time for reflection. Ignore the phone, turn off the television and shut the door before you start writing.
  • Ask questions. How should you begin? Don’t feel overwhelmed; get started by asking yourself a few questions. Your statement may include a description of the kind of person you want to be, so think about the qualities you admire most in others. What are your greatest strengths? What aspects of your character would you like to change? What do you consider your guiding moral principles?

Know your priorities

A personal mission statement also may describe your individual priorities. Which relationships do you value most? What activities give you the greatest satisfaction? How do you define “success”? Your answers to these questions may reveal a need to change your present situation or redirect your future.

  • Consider your values. Give some thought to the particular values that you consider most important. Whether you treasure honesty, compassion, physical health, family or education, make a list of your top 3 values. Brainstorm 3 ways to reaffirm your commitment to each. If you value education, for instance, train as a literacy volunteer or donate old books to a senior citizen’s home.  Look for concrete opportunities to live your mission.
  • Revise and rewrite. You will probably need to revise your mission statement several times. Carry a draft with you and make changes. Don’t stop rewriting until your statement describes the best that exists within you and the best that you hope to become. Take your time and enjoy the process!
By Lauren Greenwood
Source: Success Networks, www.successnet.org; Franklin Covey: Tools for Highly Effective Living, www.franklincovey.com

Summary

  • Reserve time for soul-searching and reflection.
  • A statement of ideals and priorities, of meaning and purpose.
  • Ongoing reminder of the life you want to lead.

Many businesses create corporate mission statements that clearly express the organization’s values and goals. These declarations may be useful at the office, but many people also have benefited from writing personal mission statements. Since a personal mission statement is unique to you, there is no formula. If, however, you are feeling uncertain about your relationships, career, values or goals, then writing a personal mission statement may be the best way to clarify your beliefs and direction.  

Take time to reflect

You probably won’t sit down and write your statement in an afternoon. The process of discovering your personal mission is as important as the statement itself. Try to reserve some time for soul-searching and reflection. A personal mission statement usually is a statement of ideals and priorities, of meaning and purpose. This may seem like a tall order, but you probably already know what’s most important to you.

A personal mission statement can serve as an ongoing reminder of the life you want to lead. Your statement may help you make difficult decisions and serve as a guide in the future. Though every personal mission statement is different, here are some suggestions for getting started:

  • Find some peace and quiet. Don’t try to create your personal mission statement when you’re busy and distracted. You’ll probably need some privacy, as well as time for reflection. Ignore the phone, turn off the television and shut the door before you start writing.
  • Ask questions. How should you begin? Don’t feel overwhelmed; get started by asking yourself a few questions. Your statement may include a description of the kind of person you want to be, so think about the qualities you admire most in others. What are your greatest strengths? What aspects of your character would you like to change? What do you consider your guiding moral principles?

Know your priorities

A personal mission statement also may describe your individual priorities. Which relationships do you value most? What activities give you the greatest satisfaction? How do you define “success”? Your answers to these questions may reveal a need to change your present situation or redirect your future.

  • Consider your values. Give some thought to the particular values that you consider most important. Whether you treasure honesty, compassion, physical health, family or education, make a list of your top 3 values. Brainstorm 3 ways to reaffirm your commitment to each. If you value education, for instance, train as a literacy volunteer or donate old books to a senior citizen’s home.  Look for concrete opportunities to live your mission.
  • Revise and rewrite. You will probably need to revise your mission statement several times. Carry a draft with you and make changes. Don’t stop rewriting until your statement describes the best that exists within you and the best that you hope to become. Take your time and enjoy the process!
By Lauren Greenwood
Source: Success Networks, www.successnet.org; Franklin Covey: Tools for Highly Effective Living, www.franklincovey.com

Summary

  • Reserve time for soul-searching and reflection.
  • A statement of ideals and priorities, of meaning and purpose.
  • Ongoing reminder of the life you want to lead.

Many businesses create corporate mission statements that clearly express the organization’s values and goals. These declarations may be useful at the office, but many people also have benefited from writing personal mission statements. Since a personal mission statement is unique to you, there is no formula. If, however, you are feeling uncertain about your relationships, career, values or goals, then writing a personal mission statement may be the best way to clarify your beliefs and direction.  

Take time to reflect

You probably won’t sit down and write your statement in an afternoon. The process of discovering your personal mission is as important as the statement itself. Try to reserve some time for soul-searching and reflection. A personal mission statement usually is a statement of ideals and priorities, of meaning and purpose. This may seem like a tall order, but you probably already know what’s most important to you.

A personal mission statement can serve as an ongoing reminder of the life you want to lead. Your statement may help you make difficult decisions and serve as a guide in the future. Though every personal mission statement is different, here are some suggestions for getting started:

  • Find some peace and quiet. Don’t try to create your personal mission statement when you’re busy and distracted. You’ll probably need some privacy, as well as time for reflection. Ignore the phone, turn off the television and shut the door before you start writing.
  • Ask questions. How should you begin? Don’t feel overwhelmed; get started by asking yourself a few questions. Your statement may include a description of the kind of person you want to be, so think about the qualities you admire most in others. What are your greatest strengths? What aspects of your character would you like to change? What do you consider your guiding moral principles?

Know your priorities

A personal mission statement also may describe your individual priorities. Which relationships do you value most? What activities give you the greatest satisfaction? How do you define “success”? Your answers to these questions may reveal a need to change your present situation or redirect your future.

  • Consider your values. Give some thought to the particular values that you consider most important. Whether you treasure honesty, compassion, physical health, family or education, make a list of your top 3 values. Brainstorm 3 ways to reaffirm your commitment to each. If you value education, for instance, train as a literacy volunteer or donate old books to a senior citizen’s home.  Look for concrete opportunities to live your mission.
  • Revise and rewrite. You will probably need to revise your mission statement several times. Carry a draft with you and make changes. Don’t stop rewriting until your statement describes the best that exists within you and the best that you hope to become. Take your time and enjoy the process!
By Lauren Greenwood
Source: Success Networks, www.successnet.org; Franklin Covey: Tools for Highly Effective Living, www.franklincovey.com

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