Poll Finds Health Most Common Major Stressful Event in Americans' Lives Last Year

Posted Aug 18, 2014

Close

E-mail Article

Complete form to e-mail article…

Required fields are denoted by an asterisk (*) adjacent to the label.

Separate multiple recipients with a comma

Close

Sign-Up For Newsletters

Complete this form to sign-up for newsletters…

Required fields are denoted by an asterisk (*) adjacent to the label.

 
A new NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard School of Public Health (RWJF/HSPH) poll released July 7, 2014, that examines the role of stress in Americans’ lives finds that about half of the public (49 percent) reported that they had a major stressful event or experience in the past year. Nearly half (43 percent) reported that the most stressful experiences related to health.
 
More than half of those who experienced a great deal of stress in the past month say too many overall responsibilities and financial problems were contributors (54 percent and 53 percent respectively). More than a third of those with a great deal of stress say the contributors include their own health problems (38 percent) and health problems of family members (37 percent).
 
“It is not widely recognized how many Americans have a major stressful event over the course of a year, or how often health problems are the cause,” says Robert Blendon, Richard L. Menschel Professor of Health Policy and Political Analysis at HSPH.
 
“Stress touches everyone. Unfortunately, many of those feeling the most stress get trapped in cycles that can be very unhealthy. If we are going to build a culture of health in America, 1 big step we can take is recognizing the causes and effects not just of our own stress and the stress of those closest to us, but of others we encounter in our day-to-day lives. That recognition can go a long way in helping us create healthier environments in our homes, workplaces and communities,” says Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, RWJF president and CEO.
 
High levels of stress in the last month
 
About a quarter reported having a “great deal” of stress (26 percent) over just the past month. People in poor health are more than twice as likely as the public as a whole to report a great deal of stress in the past month (60 percent).
 
People who are disabled are also much more likely to report a great deal of stress (45 percent). Other groups likely to report a great deal of stress include those with a chronic illness (36 percent), those with low incomes (<$20K) (36 percent), those who face potentially dangerous situations in their jobs (36 percent), single parents (35 percent), and parents of teens (34 percent).
Source: Harvard School of Public Health, http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/press-releases/npr-rwjf-hsph-poll-finds-health-a-common-source-of-stress/
A new NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard School of Public Health (RWJF/HSPH) poll released July 7, 2014, that examines the role of stress in Americans’ lives finds that about half of the public (49 percent) reported that they had a major stressful event or experience in the past year. Nearly half (43 percent) reported that the most stressful experiences related to health.
 
More than half of those who experienced a great deal of stress in the past month say too many overall responsibilities and financial problems were contributors (54 percent and 53 percent respectively). More than a third of those with a great deal of stress say the contributors include their own health problems (38 percent) and health problems of family members (37 percent).
 
“It is not widely recognized how many Americans have a major stressful event over the course of a year, or how often health problems are the cause,” says Robert Blendon, Richard L. Menschel Professor of Health Policy and Political Analysis at HSPH.
 
“Stress touches everyone. Unfortunately, many of those feeling the most stress get trapped in cycles that can be very unhealthy. If we are going to build a culture of health in America, 1 big step we can take is recognizing the causes and effects not just of our own stress and the stress of those closest to us, but of others we encounter in our day-to-day lives. That recognition can go a long way in helping us create healthier environments in our homes, workplaces and communities,” says Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, RWJF president and CEO.
 
High levels of stress in the last month
 
About a quarter reported having a “great deal” of stress (26 percent) over just the past month. People in poor health are more than twice as likely as the public as a whole to report a great deal of stress in the past month (60 percent).
 
People who are disabled are also much more likely to report a great deal of stress (45 percent). Other groups likely to report a great deal of stress include those with a chronic illness (36 percent), those with low incomes (<$20K) (36 percent), those who face potentially dangerous situations in their jobs (36 percent), single parents (35 percent), and parents of teens (34 percent).
Source: Harvard School of Public Health, http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/press-releases/npr-rwjf-hsph-poll-finds-health-a-common-source-of-stress/
A new NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard School of Public Health (RWJF/HSPH) poll released July 7, 2014, that examines the role of stress in Americans’ lives finds that about half of the public (49 percent) reported that they had a major stressful event or experience in the past year. Nearly half (43 percent) reported that the most stressful experiences related to health.
 
More than half of those who experienced a great deal of stress in the past month say too many overall responsibilities and financial problems were contributors (54 percent and 53 percent respectively). More than a third of those with a great deal of stress say the contributors include their own health problems (38 percent) and health problems of family members (37 percent).
 
“It is not widely recognized how many Americans have a major stressful event over the course of a year, or how often health problems are the cause,” says Robert Blendon, Richard L. Menschel Professor of Health Policy and Political Analysis at HSPH.
 
“Stress touches everyone. Unfortunately, many of those feeling the most stress get trapped in cycles that can be very unhealthy. If we are going to build a culture of health in America, 1 big step we can take is recognizing the causes and effects not just of our own stress and the stress of those closest to us, but of others we encounter in our day-to-day lives. That recognition can go a long way in helping us create healthier environments in our homes, workplaces and communities,” says Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, RWJF president and CEO.
 
High levels of stress in the last month
 
About a quarter reported having a “great deal” of stress (26 percent) over just the past month. People in poor health are more than twice as likely as the public as a whole to report a great deal of stress in the past month (60 percent).
 
People who are disabled are also much more likely to report a great deal of stress (45 percent). Other groups likely to report a great deal of stress include those with a chronic illness (36 percent), those with low incomes (<$20K) (36 percent), those who face potentially dangerous situations in their jobs (36 percent), single parents (35 percent), and parents of teens (34 percent).
Source: Harvard School of Public Health, http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/press-releases/npr-rwjf-hsph-poll-finds-health-a-common-source-of-stress/

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

Close

  • Useful Tools

    Select a tool below

© 2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.