Religion or Spirituality Has Positive Impact on Romantic/Marital Relationships, Child Development

Posted Dec 21, 2014

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 Adolescents who attend religious services with 1 or both of their parents are more likely to feel greater well-being, while romantic partners who pray for their “significant others” experience greater relationship commitment, according to research published by the American Psychological Association (APA).
 
These were among the findings of studies published in 2 special sections of APA’s Journal of Family Psychology® looking at how spiritual beliefs or behaviors have appeared to strengthen generally happy marriages and how a person’s religious and/or spiritual functioning may influence that of his or her family members.
 
“These studies exemplify an emerging subfield called relational spirituality, which focuses on the ways that diverse couples and families can rely on specific spiritual beliefs and behaviors, for better or worse, to motivate them to create, maintain and transform their intimate relationships,” according to Annette Mahoney, Ph.D., of Bowling Green State University, and Annamarie Cano, Ph.D., of Wayne State University, who edited special sections in the December and October issues of the journal. “Hopefully, publishing these articles will spur more research on ways that religion and spirituality can help or harm couples’ and families’ relationships and encourage more interchange between family psychology and the psychology of religion and spirituality.”
Source: American Psychological Association, http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2014/12/religion-relationships.aspx
 Adolescents who attend religious services with 1 or both of their parents are more likely to feel greater well-being, while romantic partners who pray for their “significant others” experience greater relationship commitment, according to research published by the American Psychological Association (APA).
 
These were among the findings of studies published in 2 special sections of APA’s Journal of Family Psychology® looking at how spiritual beliefs or behaviors have appeared to strengthen generally happy marriages and how a person’s religious and/or spiritual functioning may influence that of his or her family members.
 
“These studies exemplify an emerging subfield called relational spirituality, which focuses on the ways that diverse couples and families can rely on specific spiritual beliefs and behaviors, for better or worse, to motivate them to create, maintain and transform their intimate relationships,” according to Annette Mahoney, Ph.D., of Bowling Green State University, and Annamarie Cano, Ph.D., of Wayne State University, who edited special sections in the December and October issues of the journal. “Hopefully, publishing these articles will spur more research on ways that religion and spirituality can help or harm couples’ and families’ relationships and encourage more interchange between family psychology and the psychology of religion and spirituality.”
Source: American Psychological Association, http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2014/12/religion-relationships.aspx
 Adolescents who attend religious services with 1 or both of their parents are more likely to feel greater well-being, while romantic partners who pray for their “significant others” experience greater relationship commitment, according to research published by the American Psychological Association (APA).
 
These were among the findings of studies published in 2 special sections of APA’s Journal of Family Psychology® looking at how spiritual beliefs or behaviors have appeared to strengthen generally happy marriages and how a person’s religious and/or spiritual functioning may influence that of his or her family members.
 
“These studies exemplify an emerging subfield called relational spirituality, which focuses on the ways that diverse couples and families can rely on specific spiritual beliefs and behaviors, for better or worse, to motivate them to create, maintain and transform their intimate relationships,” according to Annette Mahoney, Ph.D., of Bowling Green State University, and Annamarie Cano, Ph.D., of Wayne State University, who edited special sections in the December and October issues of the journal. “Hopefully, publishing these articles will spur more research on ways that religion and spirituality can help or harm couples’ and families’ relationships and encourage more interchange between family psychology and the psychology of religion and spirituality.”
Source: American Psychological Association, http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2014/12/religion-relationships.aspx

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