Connecting Through Holiday Cards

Reviewed Jan 22, 2019

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Summary

Display your cards on a:

  • Holiday bulletin board
  • Greetings tree
  • Card garland

Whether you buy cards or make your own, holiday cards are a way to connect with friends and family with whom you might not keep in touch often.
 
Making your own cards

Making your own cards may save you money, and also lets you send a personal holiday message. You can be creative, and get your whole family involved. Here are some ideas for crafting your own cards:

  • Make cards using family photos.
  • Make a card using clip art, photos, or graphics.
  • Use ribbons, paper, glitter, confetti, fabric, stickers, rubber stamps, or stenciling.
  • Send e-greetings, or make a video message.

Buying cards

If you don’t want to, or can’t, spend the time to make cards, buy cards and then personalize them. You can include family pictures, a note of your own, or a family letter.

Crafting family newsletters

You may also want to add a newsletter with your greetings.

The key to a good holiday newsletter, says Judith Blahink, author of Checklist for a Perfect Christmas, is plenty of personal details. Adding features that are lively, entertaining, and a reflection of your life will catch readers’ attention. Blahink advises keeping letters to one or two 8 ½- by 11-inch pages typed or written, leaving room between paragraphs, in the middle of sentences, and in margins for added decoration. Make careful selections about what you say and stay with an easy-to-read design.

A fun way to involve your family in making the newsletter is to name your child editor in chief. This child gives news stories to other family reporters. Family members can tell about school or work happenings, time off, or special accomplishments. They can also draw pictures to show the stories. When the stories are written and illustrated, children can copy them and staple the pages together.

If you have a website or blog, you can post the family newsletter on the site instead of sending it along with cards.

Surround yourself with holiday cards from loved ones

Holiday cards also can make inventive decorations. Some ideas:

  • Holiday bulletin board. Show off cards on a bulletin board adorned with fabric and ribbon.
  • Greetings tree. Place tree branches in a vase. Punch holes in the tops of the cards, string ribbon through the holes, then hang the cards from the branches.
  • Card garland. Attach cards to a long strip of ribbon, and then string the garland up from your mantel.
  • Ribbon streamers. Hang strips of wide ribbon from the back of a door and attach cards to the ribbon using a needle and thread.
  • Matchbox Advent calendar. Select pictures from old holiday cards to cover matchboxes for an Advent calendar.
  • Collages. Cut out pictures from old holiday cards and paste them to pieces of colored cardboard or paper, or cover a box of tissues with them.
  • Gift tags. Cut out a picture from old holiday cards, punch a hole in it, string a ribbon through the hole, and attach it to a gift. Write to whom the gift is for on the back of the picture.
  • Ornaments. Cut out scenes from holiday cards. Decorate the cutout with glitter or pipe cleaners, and hang on your Christmas tree.

Resources

www.familyeducation.com

The Greenest Dollar
www.thegreenestdollar.com/2009/05/how-make-your-own-handmade-greeting-cards/

By Amy Daugherty

Summary

Display your cards on a:

  • Holiday bulletin board
  • Greetings tree
  • Card garland

Whether you buy cards or make your own, holiday cards are a way to connect with friends and family with whom you might not keep in touch often.
 
Making your own cards

Making your own cards may save you money, and also lets you send a personal holiday message. You can be creative, and get your whole family involved. Here are some ideas for crafting your own cards:

  • Make cards using family photos.
  • Make a card using clip art, photos, or graphics.
  • Use ribbons, paper, glitter, confetti, fabric, stickers, rubber stamps, or stenciling.
  • Send e-greetings, or make a video message.

Buying cards

If you don’t want to, or can’t, spend the time to make cards, buy cards and then personalize them. You can include family pictures, a note of your own, or a family letter.

Crafting family newsletters

You may also want to add a newsletter with your greetings.

The key to a good holiday newsletter, says Judith Blahink, author of Checklist for a Perfect Christmas, is plenty of personal details. Adding features that are lively, entertaining, and a reflection of your life will catch readers’ attention. Blahink advises keeping letters to one or two 8 ½- by 11-inch pages typed or written, leaving room between paragraphs, in the middle of sentences, and in margins for added decoration. Make careful selections about what you say and stay with an easy-to-read design.

A fun way to involve your family in making the newsletter is to name your child editor in chief. This child gives news stories to other family reporters. Family members can tell about school or work happenings, time off, or special accomplishments. They can also draw pictures to show the stories. When the stories are written and illustrated, children can copy them and staple the pages together.

If you have a website or blog, you can post the family newsletter on the site instead of sending it along with cards.

Surround yourself with holiday cards from loved ones

Holiday cards also can make inventive decorations. Some ideas:

  • Holiday bulletin board. Show off cards on a bulletin board adorned with fabric and ribbon.
  • Greetings tree. Place tree branches in a vase. Punch holes in the tops of the cards, string ribbon through the holes, then hang the cards from the branches.
  • Card garland. Attach cards to a long strip of ribbon, and then string the garland up from your mantel.
  • Ribbon streamers. Hang strips of wide ribbon from the back of a door and attach cards to the ribbon using a needle and thread.
  • Matchbox Advent calendar. Select pictures from old holiday cards to cover matchboxes for an Advent calendar.
  • Collages. Cut out pictures from old holiday cards and paste them to pieces of colored cardboard or paper, or cover a box of tissues with them.
  • Gift tags. Cut out a picture from old holiday cards, punch a hole in it, string a ribbon through the hole, and attach it to a gift. Write to whom the gift is for on the back of the picture.
  • Ornaments. Cut out scenes from holiday cards. Decorate the cutout with glitter or pipe cleaners, and hang on your Christmas tree.

Resources

www.familyeducation.com

The Greenest Dollar
www.thegreenestdollar.com/2009/05/how-make-your-own-handmade-greeting-cards/

By Amy Daugherty

Summary

Display your cards on a:

  • Holiday bulletin board
  • Greetings tree
  • Card garland

Whether you buy cards or make your own, holiday cards are a way to connect with friends and family with whom you might not keep in touch often.
 
Making your own cards

Making your own cards may save you money, and also lets you send a personal holiday message. You can be creative, and get your whole family involved. Here are some ideas for crafting your own cards:

  • Make cards using family photos.
  • Make a card using clip art, photos, or graphics.
  • Use ribbons, paper, glitter, confetti, fabric, stickers, rubber stamps, or stenciling.
  • Send e-greetings, or make a video message.

Buying cards

If you don’t want to, or can’t, spend the time to make cards, buy cards and then personalize them. You can include family pictures, a note of your own, or a family letter.

Crafting family newsletters

You may also want to add a newsletter with your greetings.

The key to a good holiday newsletter, says Judith Blahink, author of Checklist for a Perfect Christmas, is plenty of personal details. Adding features that are lively, entertaining, and a reflection of your life will catch readers’ attention. Blahink advises keeping letters to one or two 8 ½- by 11-inch pages typed or written, leaving room between paragraphs, in the middle of sentences, and in margins for added decoration. Make careful selections about what you say and stay with an easy-to-read design.

A fun way to involve your family in making the newsletter is to name your child editor in chief. This child gives news stories to other family reporters. Family members can tell about school or work happenings, time off, or special accomplishments. They can also draw pictures to show the stories. When the stories are written and illustrated, children can copy them and staple the pages together.

If you have a website or blog, you can post the family newsletter on the site instead of sending it along with cards.

Surround yourself with holiday cards from loved ones

Holiday cards also can make inventive decorations. Some ideas:

  • Holiday bulletin board. Show off cards on a bulletin board adorned with fabric and ribbon.
  • Greetings tree. Place tree branches in a vase. Punch holes in the tops of the cards, string ribbon through the holes, then hang the cards from the branches.
  • Card garland. Attach cards to a long strip of ribbon, and then string the garland up from your mantel.
  • Ribbon streamers. Hang strips of wide ribbon from the back of a door and attach cards to the ribbon using a needle and thread.
  • Matchbox Advent calendar. Select pictures from old holiday cards to cover matchboxes for an Advent calendar.
  • Collages. Cut out pictures from old holiday cards and paste them to pieces of colored cardboard or paper, or cover a box of tissues with them.
  • Gift tags. Cut out a picture from old holiday cards, punch a hole in it, string a ribbon through the hole, and attach it to a gift. Write to whom the gift is for on the back of the picture.
  • Ornaments. Cut out scenes from holiday cards. Decorate the cutout with glitter or pipe cleaners, and hang on your Christmas tree.

Resources

www.familyeducation.com

The Greenest Dollar
www.thegreenestdollar.com/2009/05/how-make-your-own-handmade-greeting-cards/

By Amy Daugherty

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, assessments, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as behavioral health care or management advice. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have questions related to workplace issues, please contact your human resources department. ©2019 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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