Treating Substance Use Disorder Through Behavior Change

Reviewed Feb 1, 2016

Close

E-mail Article

Complete form to e-mail article…

Required fields are denoted by an asterisk (*) adjacent to the label.

Separate multiple recipients with a comma

Close

Sign-Up For Newsletters

Complete this form to sign-up for newsletters…

Required fields are denoted by an asterisk (*) adjacent to the label.

 

Summary

Behavioral therapies help engage people in substance use disorder treatment, modifying their attitudes and behaviors related to drug use.

Behavioral treatments help engage people in substance use disorder treatment, modifying their attitudes and behaviors related to drug use and increasing their life skills to handle stressful circumstances and environmental cues that may trigger intense craving for drugs and prompt another cycle of compulsive use. Behavioral therapies can also enhance the effectiveness of medications and help people remain in treatment longer.
 
Gaining the ability to stop abusing drugs is just one part of a long and complex recovery process. When people enter treatment for a substance use disorder, addiction has often taken over their lives. The compulsion to get drugs, take drugs and experience the effects of drugs has dominated their every waking moment, and abusing drugs has taken the place of all the things they used to enjoy doing. It has disrupted how they function in their family lives, at work and in the community, and has made them more likely to have other serious illnesses.
 
Because addiction can affect so many aspects of a person’s life, treatment must address the needs of the whole person to be successful. This is why the best programs incorporate a variety of rehabilitative services into their comprehensive treatment regimens. Treatment counselors may select from a menu of services for meeting the specific medical, psychological, social, vocational and legal needs of their patients to foster their recovery from addiction.
 
Some therapies include: 
 
Cognitive-behavioral therapy seeks to help patients recognize, avoid, and cope with the situations in which they are most likely to use drugs.
 
Contingency management uses positive reinforcement such as providing rewards or privileges for remaining drug free, for attending and participating in counseling sessions, or for taking treatment medications as prescribed.
 
Motivational enhancement therapy uses strategies to evoke rapid and internally motivated behavior change to stop drug use and facilitate treatment entry.
 
Family therapy (especially for youth) approaches a person’s drug problems in the context of family interactions and dynamics that may contribute to drug use and other risky behaviors.
Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse, www.drugabuse.gov/publications/science-addiction/treatment-recovery

Summary

Behavioral therapies help engage people in substance use disorder treatment, modifying their attitudes and behaviors related to drug use.

Behavioral treatments help engage people in substance use disorder treatment, modifying their attitudes and behaviors related to drug use and increasing their life skills to handle stressful circumstances and environmental cues that may trigger intense craving for drugs and prompt another cycle of compulsive use. Behavioral therapies can also enhance the effectiveness of medications and help people remain in treatment longer.
 
Gaining the ability to stop abusing drugs is just one part of a long and complex recovery process. When people enter treatment for a substance use disorder, addiction has often taken over their lives. The compulsion to get drugs, take drugs and experience the effects of drugs has dominated their every waking moment, and abusing drugs has taken the place of all the things they used to enjoy doing. It has disrupted how they function in their family lives, at work and in the community, and has made them more likely to have other serious illnesses.
 
Because addiction can affect so many aspects of a person’s life, treatment must address the needs of the whole person to be successful. This is why the best programs incorporate a variety of rehabilitative services into their comprehensive treatment regimens. Treatment counselors may select from a menu of services for meeting the specific medical, psychological, social, vocational and legal needs of their patients to foster their recovery from addiction.
 
Some therapies include: 
 
Cognitive-behavioral therapy seeks to help patients recognize, avoid, and cope with the situations in which they are most likely to use drugs.
 
Contingency management uses positive reinforcement such as providing rewards or privileges for remaining drug free, for attending and participating in counseling sessions, or for taking treatment medications as prescribed.
 
Motivational enhancement therapy uses strategies to evoke rapid and internally motivated behavior change to stop drug use and facilitate treatment entry.
 
Family therapy (especially for youth) approaches a person’s drug problems in the context of family interactions and dynamics that may contribute to drug use and other risky behaviors.
Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse, www.drugabuse.gov/publications/science-addiction/treatment-recovery

Summary

Behavioral therapies help engage people in substance use disorder treatment, modifying their attitudes and behaviors related to drug use.

Behavioral treatments help engage people in substance use disorder treatment, modifying their attitudes and behaviors related to drug use and increasing their life skills to handle stressful circumstances and environmental cues that may trigger intense craving for drugs and prompt another cycle of compulsive use. Behavioral therapies can also enhance the effectiveness of medications and help people remain in treatment longer.
 
Gaining the ability to stop abusing drugs is just one part of a long and complex recovery process. When people enter treatment for a substance use disorder, addiction has often taken over their lives. The compulsion to get drugs, take drugs and experience the effects of drugs has dominated their every waking moment, and abusing drugs has taken the place of all the things they used to enjoy doing. It has disrupted how they function in their family lives, at work and in the community, and has made them more likely to have other serious illnesses.
 
Because addiction can affect so many aspects of a person’s life, treatment must address the needs of the whole person to be successful. This is why the best programs incorporate a variety of rehabilitative services into their comprehensive treatment regimens. Treatment counselors may select from a menu of services for meeting the specific medical, psychological, social, vocational and legal needs of their patients to foster their recovery from addiction.
 
Some therapies include: 
 
Cognitive-behavioral therapy seeks to help patients recognize, avoid, and cope with the situations in which they are most likely to use drugs.
 
Contingency management uses positive reinforcement such as providing rewards or privileges for remaining drug free, for attending and participating in counseling sessions, or for taking treatment medications as prescribed.
 
Motivational enhancement therapy uses strategies to evoke rapid and internally motivated behavior change to stop drug use and facilitate treatment entry.
 
Family therapy (especially for youth) approaches a person’s drug problems in the context of family interactions and dynamics that may contribute to drug use and other risky behaviors.
Source: National Institute on Drug Abuse, www.drugabuse.gov/publications/science-addiction/treatment-recovery

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

Close

  • Useful Tools

    Select a tool below

© 2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.