The Importance of Work as Part of Your Recovery

Reviewed Apr 22, 2017

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Summary

Work can include a paid job, volunteering, or going to school.

Work can be a big part of recovery. Work doesn’t mean going to a 9:00 - 5:00 job every day. If working full time is scary, don't let it stop you from working. Work can be any activity that a person does. It is something that is important to the community. Of course, work can be a paid job. But, it can also be volunteering, raising children, homemaking, or going to school. All of these activities have value, even if you don’t get paid.

Some members are anxious about going back to work because they think job stress might cause a relapse. Others think they can’t work because they still have symptoms, such as hearing voices, or being depressed. Still others have been out of work for so long that they don’t think they can handle a job.

In spite of the challenges, work can have a good effect on recovery. Recovery doesn’t mean that a person no longer has symptoms. Recovery has a much more complex definition than that. Members who are successful have described recovery as:

  •  Having hope for the future
  •  Having a reason to get up in the morning
  •  Being able to make and keep friends
  •  Doing something worthwhile
  •  Being sure about their ability to handle stress
  •  Believing that there is a link between personal effort and success
  •  Being able to make choices

Work can help your recovery in all of these areas. It gives you a chance to make friends, helps you set goals, and if you get paid, gives you more choices in your life.

By Haline Grublak, CPHQ, Vice President of Member & Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options

Summary

Work can include a paid job, volunteering, or going to school.

Work can be a big part of recovery. Work doesn’t mean going to a 9:00 - 5:00 job every day. If working full time is scary, don't let it stop you from working. Work can be any activity that a person does. It is something that is important to the community. Of course, work can be a paid job. But, it can also be volunteering, raising children, homemaking, or going to school. All of these activities have value, even if you don’t get paid.

Some members are anxious about going back to work because they think job stress might cause a relapse. Others think they can’t work because they still have symptoms, such as hearing voices, or being depressed. Still others have been out of work for so long that they don’t think they can handle a job.

In spite of the challenges, work can have a good effect on recovery. Recovery doesn’t mean that a person no longer has symptoms. Recovery has a much more complex definition than that. Members who are successful have described recovery as:

  •  Having hope for the future
  •  Having a reason to get up in the morning
  •  Being able to make and keep friends
  •  Doing something worthwhile
  •  Being sure about their ability to handle stress
  •  Believing that there is a link between personal effort and success
  •  Being able to make choices

Work can help your recovery in all of these areas. It gives you a chance to make friends, helps you set goals, and if you get paid, gives you more choices in your life.

By Haline Grublak, CPHQ, Vice President of Member & Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options

Summary

Work can include a paid job, volunteering, or going to school.

Work can be a big part of recovery. Work doesn’t mean going to a 9:00 - 5:00 job every day. If working full time is scary, don't let it stop you from working. Work can be any activity that a person does. It is something that is important to the community. Of course, work can be a paid job. But, it can also be volunteering, raising children, homemaking, or going to school. All of these activities have value, even if you don’t get paid.

Some members are anxious about going back to work because they think job stress might cause a relapse. Others think they can’t work because they still have symptoms, such as hearing voices, or being depressed. Still others have been out of work for so long that they don’t think they can handle a job.

In spite of the challenges, work can have a good effect on recovery. Recovery doesn’t mean that a person no longer has symptoms. Recovery has a much more complex definition than that. Members who are successful have described recovery as:

  •  Having hope for the future
  •  Having a reason to get up in the morning
  •  Being able to make and keep friends
  •  Doing something worthwhile
  •  Being sure about their ability to handle stress
  •  Believing that there is a link between personal effort and success
  •  Being able to make choices

Work can help your recovery in all of these areas. It gives you a chance to make friends, helps you set goals, and if you get paid, gives you more choices in your life.

By Haline Grublak, CPHQ, Vice President of Member & Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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