Job Accommodations for Those With Mental Illness

Reviewed Apr 22, 2017

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Summary

Reasonable job accommodations:

  • Leave of absence without pay.
  • Policy changes.
  • Changing the work schedule.

A job accommodation is a change that is made to a job or the workplace. The change helps a worker with a disability do the basic duties of the job. This change does not alter the main job functions. The accommodation cannot cost too much. It also can’t make the employer change their location. Examples of accommodations for persons who have a mental illness may include:

  • Leave of absence without pay (for example, counseling, hospitalizations, taking care of symptoms).
  • Policy changes. These can include letting someone on medicine take breaks more often. These breaks may be to drink water or use the bathroom.
  • Bringing a job coach to work to help learn the job.
  • Changing the work schedule. This is helpful if a person’s medicine makes him groggy in the morning. 

These are examples of a few types of accommodations that might help a person with disabilities succeed on the job.

If you think a job accommodation will help you, talk to your boss. It’s not your employer’s duty to guess if you need one. He won’t be held liable if he doesn’t give you an accommodation if you didn’t ask. You don’t have to ask for it in writing. But, you should keep some kind of record of any talks or meetings you have.

Once you’ve asked for a job accommodation, your company must make a good effort to set it up. You also have to be willing to work with your company. If you don’t work with them in setting up the change, you may lose your rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Your company may ask you to show medical proof of your disability. If your company suggests a change, and you don’t think it will help, you should suggest something else. You may want to ask for an advocate to help you.

By Haline Grublak, CPHQ, Vice President of Member & Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options

Summary

Reasonable job accommodations:

  • Leave of absence without pay.
  • Policy changes.
  • Changing the work schedule.

A job accommodation is a change that is made to a job or the workplace. The change helps a worker with a disability do the basic duties of the job. This change does not alter the main job functions. The accommodation cannot cost too much. It also can’t make the employer change their location. Examples of accommodations for persons who have a mental illness may include:

  • Leave of absence without pay (for example, counseling, hospitalizations, taking care of symptoms).
  • Policy changes. These can include letting someone on medicine take breaks more often. These breaks may be to drink water or use the bathroom.
  • Bringing a job coach to work to help learn the job.
  • Changing the work schedule. This is helpful if a person’s medicine makes him groggy in the morning. 

These are examples of a few types of accommodations that might help a person with disabilities succeed on the job.

If you think a job accommodation will help you, talk to your boss. It’s not your employer’s duty to guess if you need one. He won’t be held liable if he doesn’t give you an accommodation if you didn’t ask. You don’t have to ask for it in writing. But, you should keep some kind of record of any talks or meetings you have.

Once you’ve asked for a job accommodation, your company must make a good effort to set it up. You also have to be willing to work with your company. If you don’t work with them in setting up the change, you may lose your rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Your company may ask you to show medical proof of your disability. If your company suggests a change, and you don’t think it will help, you should suggest something else. You may want to ask for an advocate to help you.

By Haline Grublak, CPHQ, Vice President of Member & Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options

Summary

Reasonable job accommodations:

  • Leave of absence without pay.
  • Policy changes.
  • Changing the work schedule.

A job accommodation is a change that is made to a job or the workplace. The change helps a worker with a disability do the basic duties of the job. This change does not alter the main job functions. The accommodation cannot cost too much. It also can’t make the employer change their location. Examples of accommodations for persons who have a mental illness may include:

  • Leave of absence without pay (for example, counseling, hospitalizations, taking care of symptoms).
  • Policy changes. These can include letting someone on medicine take breaks more often. These breaks may be to drink water or use the bathroom.
  • Bringing a job coach to work to help learn the job.
  • Changing the work schedule. This is helpful if a person’s medicine makes him groggy in the morning. 

These are examples of a few types of accommodations that might help a person with disabilities succeed on the job.

If you think a job accommodation will help you, talk to your boss. It’s not your employer’s duty to guess if you need one. He won’t be held liable if he doesn’t give you an accommodation if you didn’t ask. You don’t have to ask for it in writing. But, you should keep some kind of record of any talks or meetings you have.

Once you’ve asked for a job accommodation, your company must make a good effort to set it up. You also have to be willing to work with your company. If you don’t work with them in setting up the change, you may lose your rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Your company may ask you to show medical proof of your disability. If your company suggests a change, and you don’t think it will help, you should suggest something else. You may want to ask for an advocate to help you.

By Haline Grublak, CPHQ, Vice President of Member & Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, assessments, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological, or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2019 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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