Working With People: Teamwork Is the Key to Success

Reviewed Apr 22, 2017

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Summary

How to be part of the team:

  • Get to know your co-workers.
  • Learn your job.
  • Be discreet about your illness.

A team is a group of people who work with others to reach a common goal. When you start a new job, you will become part of the team. This doesn’t happen right away. It will take some time for you to learn your job and for co-workers to get to know you and know what your skills are. As you get better at your job, others will begin to respect you. Here are some ideas:

  • Get to know your co-workers. You will be spending a large part of the day with them, so you want to have good working relationships.
  • Learn your job. Find out what others expect from you. Notice how co-workers do their job and follow their lead. As you learn your job, you may come up with a better way to do things. Ask before you change anything because there might be a reason why things are done a certain way.
  • Don’t be easily upset. People at work often show their fondness for each other by teasing and joking. If this happens, don’t get angry. Be a good sport and let others know you value a good joke. If you really can’t handle the joking, talk to your co-workers first, before talking to your supervisor. If the jokes are cruel or are in the form of sexual or racial discrimination, let your supervisor know.
  • Be careful when you talk about your mental illness if you have one. Those who have had a lot of experience with support groups or therapy can be very open about their illness. Talking about your mental health issues is proper in a support group but it is not appropriate on the job. Many people in the community don't understand mental illness and still believe stereotypes. As you make close friends, you will have to decide on an individual basis whether to disclose your illness.
  • Don’t be a know-it-all. You are the new kid on the block. Get to know your company and co-workers before you try to change things.
  • Don’t get involved in gossip. There may be times when co-workers try to get you to listen to gossip about another team member. Gossip at work is something you should always avoid. It is hurtful and has never solved a problem.
  • Share credit when it’s deserved. If a co-worker helps you with a project, share the credit. Taking credit for someone else’s work is like stealing; you are stealing their appreciation and their respect.
By Haline Grublak, CPHQ, Vice President of Member & Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options

Summary

How to be part of the team:

  • Get to know your co-workers.
  • Learn your job.
  • Be discreet about your illness.

A team is a group of people who work with others to reach a common goal. When you start a new job, you will become part of the team. This doesn’t happen right away. It will take some time for you to learn your job and for co-workers to get to know you and know what your skills are. As you get better at your job, others will begin to respect you. Here are some ideas:

  • Get to know your co-workers. You will be spending a large part of the day with them, so you want to have good working relationships.
  • Learn your job. Find out what others expect from you. Notice how co-workers do their job and follow their lead. As you learn your job, you may come up with a better way to do things. Ask before you change anything because there might be a reason why things are done a certain way.
  • Don’t be easily upset. People at work often show their fondness for each other by teasing and joking. If this happens, don’t get angry. Be a good sport and let others know you value a good joke. If you really can’t handle the joking, talk to your co-workers first, before talking to your supervisor. If the jokes are cruel or are in the form of sexual or racial discrimination, let your supervisor know.
  • Be careful when you talk about your mental illness if you have one. Those who have had a lot of experience with support groups or therapy can be very open about their illness. Talking about your mental health issues is proper in a support group but it is not appropriate on the job. Many people in the community don't understand mental illness and still believe stereotypes. As you make close friends, you will have to decide on an individual basis whether to disclose your illness.
  • Don’t be a know-it-all. You are the new kid on the block. Get to know your company and co-workers before you try to change things.
  • Don’t get involved in gossip. There may be times when co-workers try to get you to listen to gossip about another team member. Gossip at work is something you should always avoid. It is hurtful and has never solved a problem.
  • Share credit when it’s deserved. If a co-worker helps you with a project, share the credit. Taking credit for someone else’s work is like stealing; you are stealing their appreciation and their respect.
By Haline Grublak, CPHQ, Vice President of Member & Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options

Summary

How to be part of the team:

  • Get to know your co-workers.
  • Learn your job.
  • Be discreet about your illness.

A team is a group of people who work with others to reach a common goal. When you start a new job, you will become part of the team. This doesn’t happen right away. It will take some time for you to learn your job and for co-workers to get to know you and know what your skills are. As you get better at your job, others will begin to respect you. Here are some ideas:

  • Get to know your co-workers. You will be spending a large part of the day with them, so you want to have good working relationships.
  • Learn your job. Find out what others expect from you. Notice how co-workers do their job and follow their lead. As you learn your job, you may come up with a better way to do things. Ask before you change anything because there might be a reason why things are done a certain way.
  • Don’t be easily upset. People at work often show their fondness for each other by teasing and joking. If this happens, don’t get angry. Be a good sport and let others know you value a good joke. If you really can’t handle the joking, talk to your co-workers first, before talking to your supervisor. If the jokes are cruel or are in the form of sexual or racial discrimination, let your supervisor know.
  • Be careful when you talk about your mental illness if you have one. Those who have had a lot of experience with support groups or therapy can be very open about their illness. Talking about your mental health issues is proper in a support group but it is not appropriate on the job. Many people in the community don't understand mental illness and still believe stereotypes. As you make close friends, you will have to decide on an individual basis whether to disclose your illness.
  • Don’t be a know-it-all. You are the new kid on the block. Get to know your company and co-workers before you try to change things.
  • Don’t get involved in gossip. There may be times when co-workers try to get you to listen to gossip about another team member. Gossip at work is something you should always avoid. It is hurtful and has never solved a problem.
  • Share credit when it’s deserved. If a co-worker helps you with a project, share the credit. Taking credit for someone else’s work is like stealing; you are stealing their appreciation and their respect.
By Haline Grublak, CPHQ, Vice President of Member & Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, assessments, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological, or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2019 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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