How My Culture and Traditions Can Help Me Recover

Reviewed Apr 1, 2015

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Summary

Cultural connections help you:

  • build a strong foundation
  • find peer support
  • find hope for the future

When life gets tough or we lose our way, it might be good to fall back on the guideposts our culture gives us. We can wrap ourselves up in our ethnic pride, or tap into the strength of our spirituality, or just follow the paths set before us by heroes from the past. You’ll be surprised at how much all that positive energy can help you.

We’re all part of many cultures, many groups, and whether we know it or not, we reflect at least some of their values. How? By things as simple as the foods we eat, the special days we celebrate, the clothes we wear. Or as complicated as the spiritual beliefs we hold and the moral choices we make.

All through our lives, we’re part of many groups. Our friends and family, school, religion and even our hobbies leave a mark on us. They mold our views on everything from clothes to careers. Through their example, we learn how to make the right choices when we need to.

Once in a while, we hit a bump in the road and don’t know where to turn. If our traditions are built on positive values—like honesty, fairness, peace and sharing—it’s easier to get carried in the same direction. We may not always be aware of it, but the positive energy of what we call our culture is always there to tap into, especially during stressful times.

The power of culture and tradition

Looking for a way to take control of your life? Cultural connections can help you:

1. Build wellness on a stable base.
It’s easier to take a step forward when you start out on good footing. Your culture can be the base of history, traditions and beliefs that you build on.

We may not know where we’re heading, but our culture tells us where we’ve been. If we look hard enough, we can see our future in the faces of those who share our heritage. Look at them, and you’ll get a good picture of your own strengths and possibilities. Then, use that info to move ahead.

Cultures are like anchors. They’re always there, deep below the surface of your life. They don’t move very much but give you a little rope to try different things, without floating away into dangerous waters. In other words, when you know you’re safely anchored in your culture, it’s easier to try new ways to handle any challenges you run into.

2. Find hope and purpose in life.
Research has shown that people with strong social connections are less likely than others to get sick and more likely to bounce back, if they do. Let the group you identify with lead you toward building a new outlook on life. When you’re part of something bigger than yourself, your own problems don’t look so large, after all.

3. Find a role model.
Be proud of who you are and surround yourself with the best your culture has to offer, whether it’s a special connection with nature or a knack for creating great music. Look for heroes. No doubt about it, some faced problems just like yours. Take a tip from those who succeeded and follow their paths out of life’s pitfalls.

4. Find guidelines for living.
Cultures give us moral structures, goals and values. Work them into your own recovery plan.

5. Learn lessons about life and an understanding of others.
We most often absorb values from our culture, without knowing it. Pick and chose the best part of all the groups you’re part of. Ignore the negative, take the positive, and wear it like a badge of honor.

6. Get strength from a large and diverse group.
There’s strength and comfort in numbers and diversity. Isn’t it good to know you are not alone? Your heritage is there for the asking. Be proud of who you are.

7. Get support when you need it.
Who would understand you better than people who share your background or beliefs? Their support will mean a lot to you. Don’t be afraid to ask for help when you need it.

8. Keep ties to the past and find hope for the future.
It’s good to know the strengths we’ve inherited and where those strengths can take us. Take pride in the history of your culture and know you are an important part of a long line of people sharing customs and traditions. Your family might celebrate certain holidays, wear clothes or eat foods tied to a tradition, in honor of your culture. When you do that, you bridge the gap between the past and the future.

9. A chance to help others.
As part of a group, you’ll feel good about yourself if you can help someone who needs you. Keep your eyes and ears open for a chance to share your special gifts with others.

10. Build self-worth.
As you learn more about yourself, you’ll find what makes you special in the world. We all inherit different mixes of traits from many cultures, which connect us to other people but make us unique, at the same time. Be proud of your heritage and can help you feel proud of yourself.

Resources

Mental Health America
2000 N. Beauregard St, 6th floor
Alexandria VA 22311
(800) 969-6642
www.nmha.org

Helpful websites

Mental Health America: http://www.nmha.org

MPower, Musicians for mental heath: http://www.mpoweryouth.org/411.htm

Seeds of Hope Books: http://www.seedsofhopebooks.com/index.html

Strength of Us: http://strengthofus.org/

Teen Mental Health, Medline Plus (U.S. National Library of Medicine): http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/teenmentalhealth.html

By Paula Hartman Cohen
Source: Scott Haltzman, MD, psychiatrist, author and medical director of NRI Community Services, Woonsocket, R.I.; Loretta Kearsley, RN, BA, MEd, psychiatric nurse, Charlemont. Mass.
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, CRSS, Recovery Team Manager and Julie Tull, CRSS, PFSS, ValueOptions Inc.

Summary

Cultural connections help you:

  • build a strong foundation
  • find peer support
  • find hope for the future

When life gets tough or we lose our way, it might be good to fall back on the guideposts our culture gives us. We can wrap ourselves up in our ethnic pride, or tap into the strength of our spirituality, or just follow the paths set before us by heroes from the past. You’ll be surprised at how much all that positive energy can help you.

We’re all part of many cultures, many groups, and whether we know it or not, we reflect at least some of their values. How? By things as simple as the foods we eat, the special days we celebrate, the clothes we wear. Or as complicated as the spiritual beliefs we hold and the moral choices we make.

All through our lives, we’re part of many groups. Our friends and family, school, religion and even our hobbies leave a mark on us. They mold our views on everything from clothes to careers. Through their example, we learn how to make the right choices when we need to.

Once in a while, we hit a bump in the road and don’t know where to turn. If our traditions are built on positive values—like honesty, fairness, peace and sharing—it’s easier to get carried in the same direction. We may not always be aware of it, but the positive energy of what we call our culture is always there to tap into, especially during stressful times.

The power of culture and tradition

Looking for a way to take control of your life? Cultural connections can help you:

1. Build wellness on a stable base.
It’s easier to take a step forward when you start out on good footing. Your culture can be the base of history, traditions and beliefs that you build on.

We may not know where we’re heading, but our culture tells us where we’ve been. If we look hard enough, we can see our future in the faces of those who share our heritage. Look at them, and you’ll get a good picture of your own strengths and possibilities. Then, use that info to move ahead.

Cultures are like anchors. They’re always there, deep below the surface of your life. They don’t move very much but give you a little rope to try different things, without floating away into dangerous waters. In other words, when you know you’re safely anchored in your culture, it’s easier to try new ways to handle any challenges you run into.

2. Find hope and purpose in life.
Research has shown that people with strong social connections are less likely than others to get sick and more likely to bounce back, if they do. Let the group you identify with lead you toward building a new outlook on life. When you’re part of something bigger than yourself, your own problems don’t look so large, after all.

3. Find a role model.
Be proud of who you are and surround yourself with the best your culture has to offer, whether it’s a special connection with nature or a knack for creating great music. Look for heroes. No doubt about it, some faced problems just like yours. Take a tip from those who succeeded and follow their paths out of life’s pitfalls.

4. Find guidelines for living.
Cultures give us moral structures, goals and values. Work them into your own recovery plan.

5. Learn lessons about life and an understanding of others.
We most often absorb values from our culture, without knowing it. Pick and chose the best part of all the groups you’re part of. Ignore the negative, take the positive, and wear it like a badge of honor.

6. Get strength from a large and diverse group.
There’s strength and comfort in numbers and diversity. Isn’t it good to know you are not alone? Your heritage is there for the asking. Be proud of who you are.

7. Get support when you need it.
Who would understand you better than people who share your background or beliefs? Their support will mean a lot to you. Don’t be afraid to ask for help when you need it.

8. Keep ties to the past and find hope for the future.
It’s good to know the strengths we’ve inherited and where those strengths can take us. Take pride in the history of your culture and know you are an important part of a long line of people sharing customs and traditions. Your family might celebrate certain holidays, wear clothes or eat foods tied to a tradition, in honor of your culture. When you do that, you bridge the gap between the past and the future.

9. A chance to help others.
As part of a group, you’ll feel good about yourself if you can help someone who needs you. Keep your eyes and ears open for a chance to share your special gifts with others.

10. Build self-worth.
As you learn more about yourself, you’ll find what makes you special in the world. We all inherit different mixes of traits from many cultures, which connect us to other people but make us unique, at the same time. Be proud of your heritage and can help you feel proud of yourself.

Resources

Mental Health America
2000 N. Beauregard St, 6th floor
Alexandria VA 22311
(800) 969-6642
www.nmha.org

Helpful websites

Mental Health America: http://www.nmha.org

MPower, Musicians for mental heath: http://www.mpoweryouth.org/411.htm

Seeds of Hope Books: http://www.seedsofhopebooks.com/index.html

Strength of Us: http://strengthofus.org/

Teen Mental Health, Medline Plus (U.S. National Library of Medicine): http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/teenmentalhealth.html

By Paula Hartman Cohen
Source: Scott Haltzman, MD, psychiatrist, author and medical director of NRI Community Services, Woonsocket, R.I.; Loretta Kearsley, RN, BA, MEd, psychiatric nurse, Charlemont. Mass.
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, CRSS, Recovery Team Manager and Julie Tull, CRSS, PFSS, ValueOptions Inc.

Summary

Cultural connections help you:

  • build a strong foundation
  • find peer support
  • find hope for the future

When life gets tough or we lose our way, it might be good to fall back on the guideposts our culture gives us. We can wrap ourselves up in our ethnic pride, or tap into the strength of our spirituality, or just follow the paths set before us by heroes from the past. You’ll be surprised at how much all that positive energy can help you.

We’re all part of many cultures, many groups, and whether we know it or not, we reflect at least some of their values. How? By things as simple as the foods we eat, the special days we celebrate, the clothes we wear. Or as complicated as the spiritual beliefs we hold and the moral choices we make.

All through our lives, we’re part of many groups. Our friends and family, school, religion and even our hobbies leave a mark on us. They mold our views on everything from clothes to careers. Through their example, we learn how to make the right choices when we need to.

Once in a while, we hit a bump in the road and don’t know where to turn. If our traditions are built on positive values—like honesty, fairness, peace and sharing—it’s easier to get carried in the same direction. We may not always be aware of it, but the positive energy of what we call our culture is always there to tap into, especially during stressful times.

The power of culture and tradition

Looking for a way to take control of your life? Cultural connections can help you:

1. Build wellness on a stable base.
It’s easier to take a step forward when you start out on good footing. Your culture can be the base of history, traditions and beliefs that you build on.

We may not know where we’re heading, but our culture tells us where we’ve been. If we look hard enough, we can see our future in the faces of those who share our heritage. Look at them, and you’ll get a good picture of your own strengths and possibilities. Then, use that info to move ahead.

Cultures are like anchors. They’re always there, deep below the surface of your life. They don’t move very much but give you a little rope to try different things, without floating away into dangerous waters. In other words, when you know you’re safely anchored in your culture, it’s easier to try new ways to handle any challenges you run into.

2. Find hope and purpose in life.
Research has shown that people with strong social connections are less likely than others to get sick and more likely to bounce back, if they do. Let the group you identify with lead you toward building a new outlook on life. When you’re part of something bigger than yourself, your own problems don’t look so large, after all.

3. Find a role model.
Be proud of who you are and surround yourself with the best your culture has to offer, whether it’s a special connection with nature or a knack for creating great music. Look for heroes. No doubt about it, some faced problems just like yours. Take a tip from those who succeeded and follow their paths out of life’s pitfalls.

4. Find guidelines for living.
Cultures give us moral structures, goals and values. Work them into your own recovery plan.

5. Learn lessons about life and an understanding of others.
We most often absorb values from our culture, without knowing it. Pick and chose the best part of all the groups you’re part of. Ignore the negative, take the positive, and wear it like a badge of honor.

6. Get strength from a large and diverse group.
There’s strength and comfort in numbers and diversity. Isn’t it good to know you are not alone? Your heritage is there for the asking. Be proud of who you are.

7. Get support when you need it.
Who would understand you better than people who share your background or beliefs? Their support will mean a lot to you. Don’t be afraid to ask for help when you need it.

8. Keep ties to the past and find hope for the future.
It’s good to know the strengths we’ve inherited and where those strengths can take us. Take pride in the history of your culture and know you are an important part of a long line of people sharing customs and traditions. Your family might celebrate certain holidays, wear clothes or eat foods tied to a tradition, in honor of your culture. When you do that, you bridge the gap between the past and the future.

9. A chance to help others.
As part of a group, you’ll feel good about yourself if you can help someone who needs you. Keep your eyes and ears open for a chance to share your special gifts with others.

10. Build self-worth.
As you learn more about yourself, you’ll find what makes you special in the world. We all inherit different mixes of traits from many cultures, which connect us to other people but make us unique, at the same time. Be proud of your heritage and can help you feel proud of yourself.

Resources

Mental Health America
2000 N. Beauregard St, 6th floor
Alexandria VA 22311
(800) 969-6642
www.nmha.org

Helpful websites

Mental Health America: http://www.nmha.org

MPower, Musicians for mental heath: http://www.mpoweryouth.org/411.htm

Seeds of Hope Books: http://www.seedsofhopebooks.com/index.html

Strength of Us: http://strengthofus.org/

Teen Mental Health, Medline Plus (U.S. National Library of Medicine): http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/teenmentalhealth.html

By Paula Hartman Cohen
Source: Scott Haltzman, MD, psychiatrist, author and medical director of NRI Community Services, Woonsocket, R.I.; Loretta Kearsley, RN, BA, MEd, psychiatric nurse, Charlemont. Mass.
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, CRSS, Recovery Team Manager and Julie Tull, CRSS, PFSS, ValueOptions Inc.

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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