Smartphone Addiction: No LOL Matter

Reviewed Mar 21, 2019

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Summary

Smartphone use can get out of control and even become addictive.

If you own a smartphone, you may wonder how you ever managed without it. With texting, internet access, GPS, and countless apps at your fingertips, a smartphone can simplify your life. However, smartphone use can also get out of control and even become addictive.

Signs of a problem 

If several of the following statements are true for you, it may be time to cut back on your smartphone use:

  • I would rather text my friends than speak to them face to face or on the phone.
  • I often pretend to be listening to family and friends when I am actually using my phone.
  • I have overslept in the morning after staying up too late texting friends or using other mobile apps.
  • I use my phone to text while driving.
  • I have gotten into an argument with a friend, family member, or significant other after texting him or her.
  • I check my phone several times per day for texts and respond to texts when I should be working.
  • I feel anxious if I do not have access to my phone or cannot check for text messages often.

Smartphone addiction can lead to the same kinds of problems as addictions to gambling, shopping, playing video games, and watching pornography. These include:

  • Spending too much time and money on the smartphone
  • Neglecting personal relationships and/or work
  • Risking harm or legal problems because of unwise smart phone use
  • Becoming irritable or having mood swings
  • Neglecting personal hygiene
  • Experiencing disrupted sleep
  • Having unhealthy eating habits

Cutting back

There are ways to keep your smartphone use in check so that the device enhances your life rather than complicates it. 

  • Silence your cell phone and put it in your purse or briefcase before getting behind the wheel so you won’t be tempted to check it while driving. 
  • Respect your friends, family, and acquaintances by putting your smartphone away and enjoying their company.
  • Leave your cell phone on silent or turn it off while you are at work.
  • Don’t take your cell phone to bed or use it as an alarm clock.
  • Challenge yourself to wait rather than responding immediately to every text. 
  • Give yourself a technology holiday by turning off electronics for one day and spending it with family and friends, or doing something you enjoy such as reading or hiking.

You can take advantage of all of the technology at your fingertips as long as you are smart about your smartphone usage. Use it to help you get where you’re going, touch base with others along the way if needed and take pictures when you get there, but remember to also enjoy who you’re with and the real world around you!

By Jayne Carrels-Zeller, MS, LPC, NCC, Military OneSource. Used with permission.

Summary

Smartphone use can get out of control and even become addictive.

If you own a smartphone, you may wonder how you ever managed without it. With texting, internet access, GPS, and countless apps at your fingertips, a smartphone can simplify your life. However, smartphone use can also get out of control and even become addictive.

Signs of a problem 

If several of the following statements are true for you, it may be time to cut back on your smartphone use:

  • I would rather text my friends than speak to them face to face or on the phone.
  • I often pretend to be listening to family and friends when I am actually using my phone.
  • I have overslept in the morning after staying up too late texting friends or using other mobile apps.
  • I use my phone to text while driving.
  • I have gotten into an argument with a friend, family member, or significant other after texting him or her.
  • I check my phone several times per day for texts and respond to texts when I should be working.
  • I feel anxious if I do not have access to my phone or cannot check for text messages often.

Smartphone addiction can lead to the same kinds of problems as addictions to gambling, shopping, playing video games, and watching pornography. These include:

  • Spending too much time and money on the smartphone
  • Neglecting personal relationships and/or work
  • Risking harm or legal problems because of unwise smart phone use
  • Becoming irritable or having mood swings
  • Neglecting personal hygiene
  • Experiencing disrupted sleep
  • Having unhealthy eating habits

Cutting back

There are ways to keep your smartphone use in check so that the device enhances your life rather than complicates it. 

  • Silence your cell phone and put it in your purse or briefcase before getting behind the wheel so you won’t be tempted to check it while driving. 
  • Respect your friends, family, and acquaintances by putting your smartphone away and enjoying their company.
  • Leave your cell phone on silent or turn it off while you are at work.
  • Don’t take your cell phone to bed or use it as an alarm clock.
  • Challenge yourself to wait rather than responding immediately to every text. 
  • Give yourself a technology holiday by turning off electronics for one day and spending it with family and friends, or doing something you enjoy such as reading or hiking.

You can take advantage of all of the technology at your fingertips as long as you are smart about your smartphone usage. Use it to help you get where you’re going, touch base with others along the way if needed and take pictures when you get there, but remember to also enjoy who you’re with and the real world around you!

By Jayne Carrels-Zeller, MS, LPC, NCC, Military OneSource. Used with permission.

Summary

Smartphone use can get out of control and even become addictive.

If you own a smartphone, you may wonder how you ever managed without it. With texting, internet access, GPS, and countless apps at your fingertips, a smartphone can simplify your life. However, smartphone use can also get out of control and even become addictive.

Signs of a problem 

If several of the following statements are true for you, it may be time to cut back on your smartphone use:

  • I would rather text my friends than speak to them face to face or on the phone.
  • I often pretend to be listening to family and friends when I am actually using my phone.
  • I have overslept in the morning after staying up too late texting friends or using other mobile apps.
  • I use my phone to text while driving.
  • I have gotten into an argument with a friend, family member, or significant other after texting him or her.
  • I check my phone several times per day for texts and respond to texts when I should be working.
  • I feel anxious if I do not have access to my phone or cannot check for text messages often.

Smartphone addiction can lead to the same kinds of problems as addictions to gambling, shopping, playing video games, and watching pornography. These include:

  • Spending too much time and money on the smartphone
  • Neglecting personal relationships and/or work
  • Risking harm or legal problems because of unwise smart phone use
  • Becoming irritable or having mood swings
  • Neglecting personal hygiene
  • Experiencing disrupted sleep
  • Having unhealthy eating habits

Cutting back

There are ways to keep your smartphone use in check so that the device enhances your life rather than complicates it. 

  • Silence your cell phone and put it in your purse or briefcase before getting behind the wheel so you won’t be tempted to check it while driving. 
  • Respect your friends, family, and acquaintances by putting your smartphone away and enjoying their company.
  • Leave your cell phone on silent or turn it off while you are at work.
  • Don’t take your cell phone to bed or use it as an alarm clock.
  • Challenge yourself to wait rather than responding immediately to every text. 
  • Give yourself a technology holiday by turning off electronics for one day and spending it with family and friends, or doing something you enjoy such as reading or hiking.

You can take advantage of all of the technology at your fingertips as long as you are smart about your smartphone usage. Use it to help you get where you’re going, touch base with others along the way if needed and take pictures when you get there, but remember to also enjoy who you’re with and the real world around you!

By Jayne Carrels-Zeller, MS, LPC, NCC, Military OneSource. Used with permission.

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