Choosing a Treatment Center

Reviewed Feb 19, 2018

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Summary

Consider:

  • Professional quality
  • Organizational quality

Finding a good fit to help with a mental health or substance use issue can be hard. You have to consider accreditation, quality, cost, program philosophy, insurance, and more. Here are a few ideas to help you get started:

  • Ask your doctor, a friend, or others you trust if they know of a program. Where would they take a loved one who needs the same care?
  • Call expert organizations and your state and local health care groups. Ask for a list of member clinics and credentialed experts who can help.
  • Check with your mental health insurance group on approved clinics. Your employee assistance program (EAP) can also help.

Professional quality

There are many types of people who can help:

  • Psychiatrists are medical doctors who can give meds and talk therapy.
  • Addiction medicine professionals are medical doctors who have training in the diagnosis and treatment of addictive disorders.
  • Psychologists have a doctoral degree and can give one-on-one, group, and/or family therapy. They can also test and do other assessments as part of the review or treatment process.
  • Other therapists often have a master’s degree in a related field. They can give assessments, one-on-one or group counseling, and discharge planning. This includes:
    • Licensed clinical social workers (LCSW)
    • Advance registered nurse practitioners (ARNP)
    • Licensed mental health counselors (LMHC)

Check your state’s licensing board website or the National Practitioner Data Bank for more info. Find out:

  • What is the program philosophy and treatment goals?
  • What are the expertise and credentials of the staff? What is the level of experience of the medical or clinical director?
  • Is there support for the family?

Organizational quality

Two of the most influential organizations that accredit and certify standards of quality for hospitals and mental health clinics are:

  • The Joint Commission (also known as JCAHO)
  • CARF International (formerly Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities)

Both are independent, not-for-profit groups that set the nation’s standards in health care. They each research and create professionally-based best practices. They also test the quality and compliance of health care centers.

With these groups in mind, ask:

  • Is the center or program accredited? By what group(s)?
  • Does it offer a full range of care needed for the diagnosis and treatment of a specific condition?
  • How long has it been under its current management?
  • Does it take your health plan?
  • Are there extra costs for doctors, testing, etc.?
  • What are the visitation rules?

It may sound like a lot of work, but more info will help you find the right path to recovery for you or your loved one.

Resources

American Addiction Centers
https://americanaddictioncenters.org

CARF International
www.carf.org/home

National Practitioner Data Bank
www.npdb.hrsa.gov/

The Joint Commission
www.jointcommission.org

By Drew Edwards, MS, EdDand Andrea Rizzo, MFA

Summary

Consider:

  • Professional quality
  • Organizational quality

Finding a good fit to help with a mental health or substance use issue can be hard. You have to consider accreditation, quality, cost, program philosophy, insurance, and more. Here are a few ideas to help you get started:

  • Ask your doctor, a friend, or others you trust if they know of a program. Where would they take a loved one who needs the same care?
  • Call expert organizations and your state and local health care groups. Ask for a list of member clinics and credentialed experts who can help.
  • Check with your mental health insurance group on approved clinics. Your employee assistance program (EAP) can also help.

Professional quality

There are many types of people who can help:

  • Psychiatrists are medical doctors who can give meds and talk therapy.
  • Addiction medicine professionals are medical doctors who have training in the diagnosis and treatment of addictive disorders.
  • Psychologists have a doctoral degree and can give one-on-one, group, and/or family therapy. They can also test and do other assessments as part of the review or treatment process.
  • Other therapists often have a master’s degree in a related field. They can give assessments, one-on-one or group counseling, and discharge planning. This includes:
    • Licensed clinical social workers (LCSW)
    • Advance registered nurse practitioners (ARNP)
    • Licensed mental health counselors (LMHC)

Check your state’s licensing board website or the National Practitioner Data Bank for more info. Find out:

  • What is the program philosophy and treatment goals?
  • What are the expertise and credentials of the staff? What is the level of experience of the medical or clinical director?
  • Is there support for the family?

Organizational quality

Two of the most influential organizations that accredit and certify standards of quality for hospitals and mental health clinics are:

  • The Joint Commission (also known as JCAHO)
  • CARF International (formerly Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities)

Both are independent, not-for-profit groups that set the nation’s standards in health care. They each research and create professionally-based best practices. They also test the quality and compliance of health care centers.

With these groups in mind, ask:

  • Is the center or program accredited? By what group(s)?
  • Does it offer a full range of care needed for the diagnosis and treatment of a specific condition?
  • How long has it been under its current management?
  • Does it take your health plan?
  • Are there extra costs for doctors, testing, etc.?
  • What are the visitation rules?

It may sound like a lot of work, but more info will help you find the right path to recovery for you or your loved one.

Resources

American Addiction Centers
https://americanaddictioncenters.org

CARF International
www.carf.org/home

National Practitioner Data Bank
www.npdb.hrsa.gov/

The Joint Commission
www.jointcommission.org

By Drew Edwards, MS, EdDand Andrea Rizzo, MFA

Summary

Consider:

  • Professional quality
  • Organizational quality

Finding a good fit to help with a mental health or substance use issue can be hard. You have to consider accreditation, quality, cost, program philosophy, insurance, and more. Here are a few ideas to help you get started:

  • Ask your doctor, a friend, or others you trust if they know of a program. Where would they take a loved one who needs the same care?
  • Call expert organizations and your state and local health care groups. Ask for a list of member clinics and credentialed experts who can help.
  • Check with your mental health insurance group on approved clinics. Your employee assistance program (EAP) can also help.

Professional quality

There are many types of people who can help:

  • Psychiatrists are medical doctors who can give meds and talk therapy.
  • Addiction medicine professionals are medical doctors who have training in the diagnosis and treatment of addictive disorders.
  • Psychologists have a doctoral degree and can give one-on-one, group, and/or family therapy. They can also test and do other assessments as part of the review or treatment process.
  • Other therapists often have a master’s degree in a related field. They can give assessments, one-on-one or group counseling, and discharge planning. This includes:
    • Licensed clinical social workers (LCSW)
    • Advance registered nurse practitioners (ARNP)
    • Licensed mental health counselors (LMHC)

Check your state’s licensing board website or the National Practitioner Data Bank for more info. Find out:

  • What is the program philosophy and treatment goals?
  • What are the expertise and credentials of the staff? What is the level of experience of the medical or clinical director?
  • Is there support for the family?

Organizational quality

Two of the most influential organizations that accredit and certify standards of quality for hospitals and mental health clinics are:

  • The Joint Commission (also known as JCAHO)
  • CARF International (formerly Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities)

Both are independent, not-for-profit groups that set the nation’s standards in health care. They each research and create professionally-based best practices. They also test the quality and compliance of health care centers.

With these groups in mind, ask:

  • Is the center or program accredited? By what group(s)?
  • Does it offer a full range of care needed for the diagnosis and treatment of a specific condition?
  • How long has it been under its current management?
  • Does it take your health plan?
  • Are there extra costs for doctors, testing, etc.?
  • What are the visitation rules?

It may sound like a lot of work, but more info will help you find the right path to recovery for you or your loved one.

Resources

American Addiction Centers
https://americanaddictioncenters.org

CARF International
www.carf.org/home

National Practitioner Data Bank
www.npdb.hrsa.gov/

The Joint Commission
www.jointcommission.org

By Drew Edwards, MS, EdDand Andrea Rizzo, MFA

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, assessments, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological, or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2018 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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