Should Your Mentally Ill Loved One Live at Home?

Reviewed Aug 30, 2016

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Summary

It may work if:

  • The illness is fairly well under control
  • Your loved one has friends
  • You and the rest of your family know about mental illness

Every family that is touched by mental illness is unique. That is why there is no simple answer to whether or not your loved one should live with you. Here are a few things to keep in mind.

Your loved one is more likely to succeed at home if:

  • Her illness is under control. Can she take care of her own basic needs? Can she take care of her symptoms?
  • Your loved one has friends. Is he involved in activities outside the home?
  • She gets along with others living at home. Does she get along with her brother who also lives at home?
  • Others living at home accept your loved one as a part of the family. Your loved one doesn’t feel like an outsider. He is included in family activities. Others treat him as part of the family.
  • Your loved one is willing to get involved in some kind of treatment program. This can include peer programs or regular therapy. She has others besides you who will support and help her.

Having your family member live at home is less likely to work if:

  • Your loved one can’t get involved in daily activities. This could be because her symptoms are so serious.
  • Other family members don’t want the ill member living at home.
  • Others at home can’t treat the ill relative with respect. Or they are mean, get angry, or are afraid of him.
  • The family is a single, older parent living alone.
  • Your loved one depends on you for everything. Or she doesn’t have friends outside the home.
  • The rest of the family becomes too tied up with the illness and can’t live normal lives.
  • The family member with the illness is misusing drugs and alcohol and refuses to get help.
By Haline Grublak, Vice President of Member and Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, CRSS, Recovery Team Manager and Julie Tull, CRSS, Peer & Family Support Specialist, Beacon Health Options

Summary

It may work if:

  • The illness is fairly well under control
  • Your loved one has friends
  • You and the rest of your family know about mental illness

Every family that is touched by mental illness is unique. That is why there is no simple answer to whether or not your loved one should live with you. Here are a few things to keep in mind.

Your loved one is more likely to succeed at home if:

  • Her illness is under control. Can she take care of her own basic needs? Can she take care of her symptoms?
  • Your loved one has friends. Is he involved in activities outside the home?
  • She gets along with others living at home. Does she get along with her brother who also lives at home?
  • Others living at home accept your loved one as a part of the family. Your loved one doesn’t feel like an outsider. He is included in family activities. Others treat him as part of the family.
  • Your loved one is willing to get involved in some kind of treatment program. This can include peer programs or regular therapy. She has others besides you who will support and help her.

Having your family member live at home is less likely to work if:

  • Your loved one can’t get involved in daily activities. This could be because her symptoms are so serious.
  • Other family members don’t want the ill member living at home.
  • Others at home can’t treat the ill relative with respect. Or they are mean, get angry, or are afraid of him.
  • The family is a single, older parent living alone.
  • Your loved one depends on you for everything. Or she doesn’t have friends outside the home.
  • The rest of the family becomes too tied up with the illness and can’t live normal lives.
  • The family member with the illness is misusing drugs and alcohol and refuses to get help.
By Haline Grublak, Vice President of Member and Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, CRSS, Recovery Team Manager and Julie Tull, CRSS, Peer & Family Support Specialist, Beacon Health Options

Summary

It may work if:

  • The illness is fairly well under control
  • Your loved one has friends
  • You and the rest of your family know about mental illness

Every family that is touched by mental illness is unique. That is why there is no simple answer to whether or not your loved one should live with you. Here are a few things to keep in mind.

Your loved one is more likely to succeed at home if:

  • Her illness is under control. Can she take care of her own basic needs? Can she take care of her symptoms?
  • Your loved one has friends. Is he involved in activities outside the home?
  • She gets along with others living at home. Does she get along with her brother who also lives at home?
  • Others living at home accept your loved one as a part of the family. Your loved one doesn’t feel like an outsider. He is included in family activities. Others treat him as part of the family.
  • Your loved one is willing to get involved in some kind of treatment program. This can include peer programs or regular therapy. She has others besides you who will support and help her.

Having your family member live at home is less likely to work if:

  • Your loved one can’t get involved in daily activities. This could be because her symptoms are so serious.
  • Other family members don’t want the ill member living at home.
  • Others at home can’t treat the ill relative with respect. Or they are mean, get angry, or are afraid of him.
  • The family is a single, older parent living alone.
  • Your loved one depends on you for everything. Or she doesn’t have friends outside the home.
  • The rest of the family becomes too tied up with the illness and can’t live normal lives.
  • The family member with the illness is misusing drugs and alcohol and refuses to get help.
By Haline Grublak, Vice President of Member and Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, CRSS, Recovery Team Manager and Julie Tull, CRSS, Peer & Family Support Specialist, Beacon Health Options

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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