Report Shows the Relationship Between Exposure to a Potentially Traumatic Event and Negative Health Outcomes in Adulthood

Posted Apr 26, 2016

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A new report shows that adults exposed to one or more potentially traumatic events (PTEs) in their lifetime were more likely to have health conditions such as mental illness, serious psychological distress, major depressive episodes, and suicidal thoughts in the past year than adults who had not been exposed to a PTE. People who had been exposed to a PTE were also more likely to report that they had been diagnosed by their doctor as having asthma, high blood pressure, sinusitis, or ulcer.

In addition, adults exposed to one or more lifetime PTEs were more likely to have used illicit drugs in the past year and their lifetime, have past month binge drinking and heavy drinking than among adults without exposure.

PTEs can result in post-traumatic stress (PTS) which is characterized as the limbic system’s inability to return to normal functioning following exposure to a traumatic or dangerous event. The symptoms can include lack of appetite, insomnia, an inability to feel safe, and heightened startle response. A person experiencing PTS may experience flashbacks or nightmares that may make daily tasks more difficult.

“It is critically important that people who experience trauma-related disorders get the specialized services and supports they need to achieve resilience and recovery,” said Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Principal Deputy Administrator Kana Enomoto.

The April 2016 report, Correlates of Lifetime Exposure to One or More Potentially Traumatic Events and Subsequent Posttraumatic Stress among Adults in the United States: Results from the Mental Health Surveillance Study, 2008-2012, is available at: www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/CBHSQ-DR-PTSDtrauma-2016/CBHSQ-DR-PTSDtrauma-2016.htm5

The report used data from the 2008-2012 Mental Health Surveillance Study, a nationally representative clinical follow-up study on a subsample of approximately 5,500 adults 18 years of age or older, who responded to the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/press-announcements/201604210100

A new report shows that adults exposed to one or more potentially traumatic events (PTEs) in their lifetime were more likely to have health conditions such as mental illness, serious psychological distress, major depressive episodes, and suicidal thoughts in the past year than adults who had not been exposed to a PTE. People who had been exposed to a PTE were also more likely to report that they had been diagnosed by their doctor as having asthma, high blood pressure, sinusitis, or ulcer.

In addition, adults exposed to one or more lifetime PTEs were more likely to have used illicit drugs in the past year and their lifetime, have past month binge drinking and heavy drinking than among adults without exposure.

PTEs can result in post-traumatic stress (PTS) which is characterized as the limbic system’s inability to return to normal functioning following exposure to a traumatic or dangerous event. The symptoms can include lack of appetite, insomnia, an inability to feel safe, and heightened startle response. A person experiencing PTS may experience flashbacks or nightmares that may make daily tasks more difficult.

“It is critically important that people who experience trauma-related disorders get the specialized services and supports they need to achieve resilience and recovery,” said Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Principal Deputy Administrator Kana Enomoto.

The April 2016 report, Correlates of Lifetime Exposure to One or More Potentially Traumatic Events and Subsequent Posttraumatic Stress among Adults in the United States: Results from the Mental Health Surveillance Study, 2008-2012, is available at: www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/CBHSQ-DR-PTSDtrauma-2016/CBHSQ-DR-PTSDtrauma-2016.htm5

The report used data from the 2008-2012 Mental Health Surveillance Study, a nationally representative clinical follow-up study on a subsample of approximately 5,500 adults 18 years of age or older, who responded to the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/press-announcements/201604210100

A new report shows that adults exposed to one or more potentially traumatic events (PTEs) in their lifetime were more likely to have health conditions such as mental illness, serious psychological distress, major depressive episodes, and suicidal thoughts in the past year than adults who had not been exposed to a PTE. People who had been exposed to a PTE were also more likely to report that they had been diagnosed by their doctor as having asthma, high blood pressure, sinusitis, or ulcer.

In addition, adults exposed to one or more lifetime PTEs were more likely to have used illicit drugs in the past year and their lifetime, have past month binge drinking and heavy drinking than among adults without exposure.

PTEs can result in post-traumatic stress (PTS) which is characterized as the limbic system’s inability to return to normal functioning following exposure to a traumatic or dangerous event. The symptoms can include lack of appetite, insomnia, an inability to feel safe, and heightened startle response. A person experiencing PTS may experience flashbacks or nightmares that may make daily tasks more difficult.

“It is critically important that people who experience trauma-related disorders get the specialized services and supports they need to achieve resilience and recovery,” said Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Principal Deputy Administrator Kana Enomoto.

The April 2016 report, Correlates of Lifetime Exposure to One or More Potentially Traumatic Events and Subsequent Posttraumatic Stress among Adults in the United States: Results from the Mental Health Surveillance Study, 2008-2012, is available at: www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/CBHSQ-DR-PTSDtrauma-2016/CBHSQ-DR-PTSDtrauma-2016.htm5

The report used data from the 2008-2012 Mental Health Surveillance Study, a nationally representative clinical follow-up study on a subsample of approximately 5,500 adults 18 years of age or older, who responded to the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/press-announcements/201604210100

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