Study Shows Sleep Disturbances Common Among Military Spouses

Posted Jun 17, 2016

Close

E-mail Article

Complete form to e-mail article…

Required fields are denoted by an asterisk (*) adjacent to the label.

Separate multiple recipients with a comma

Close

Sign-Up For Newsletters

Complete this form to sign-up for newsletters…

Required fields are denoted by an asterisk (*) adjacent to the label.

 

A new study found that spouses of military service members experience significant sleep problems, which can impact their health and psychosocial functioning.

Results show that 44 percent of spouses reported sleeping six hours or less per night. Approximately 54 percent of the sample endorsed daytime impairment due to sleep problems, and 62 percent reported experiencing daytime fatigue at least one to two times per week. Spouses of currently or previously deployed service members endorsed poorer sleep quality and more fatigue than spouses of service members who had never deployed.

“These results are important because we know very little about sleep problems among military spouses. Promoting sleep health may be an important strategy for enhancing military families’ adjustment in the post-deployment period,” said principal investigator Wendy Troxel, PhD, senior behavioral and social scientist at the RAND Corporation. “This is particularly relevant given that the past 14 years of protracted overseas combat have exacted an unprecedented toll on U.S. service members and their families.”

The research abstract was published in an online supplement of the journal Sleep.

The study group comprised 1,480 female spouses of military service members who completed self-report instruments related to sleep, physical health, marital satisfaction, and depression. Information regarding service member military characteristics (e.g., branch of service, deployment history) was also available.

Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, www.aasmnet.org/articles.aspx?id=6313

A new study found that spouses of military service members experience significant sleep problems, which can impact their health and psychosocial functioning.

Results show that 44 percent of spouses reported sleeping six hours or less per night. Approximately 54 percent of the sample endorsed daytime impairment due to sleep problems, and 62 percent reported experiencing daytime fatigue at least one to two times per week. Spouses of currently or previously deployed service members endorsed poorer sleep quality and more fatigue than spouses of service members who had never deployed.

“These results are important because we know very little about sleep problems among military spouses. Promoting sleep health may be an important strategy for enhancing military families’ adjustment in the post-deployment period,” said principal investigator Wendy Troxel, PhD, senior behavioral and social scientist at the RAND Corporation. “This is particularly relevant given that the past 14 years of protracted overseas combat have exacted an unprecedented toll on U.S. service members and their families.”

The research abstract was published in an online supplement of the journal Sleep.

The study group comprised 1,480 female spouses of military service members who completed self-report instruments related to sleep, physical health, marital satisfaction, and depression. Information regarding service member military characteristics (e.g., branch of service, deployment history) was also available.

Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, www.aasmnet.org/articles.aspx?id=6313

A new study found that spouses of military service members experience significant sleep problems, which can impact their health and psychosocial functioning.

Results show that 44 percent of spouses reported sleeping six hours or less per night. Approximately 54 percent of the sample endorsed daytime impairment due to sleep problems, and 62 percent reported experiencing daytime fatigue at least one to two times per week. Spouses of currently or previously deployed service members endorsed poorer sleep quality and more fatigue than spouses of service members who had never deployed.

“These results are important because we know very little about sleep problems among military spouses. Promoting sleep health may be an important strategy for enhancing military families’ adjustment in the post-deployment period,” said principal investigator Wendy Troxel, PhD, senior behavioral and social scientist at the RAND Corporation. “This is particularly relevant given that the past 14 years of protracted overseas combat have exacted an unprecedented toll on U.S. service members and their families.”

The research abstract was published in an online supplement of the journal Sleep.

The study group comprised 1,480 female spouses of military service members who completed self-report instruments related to sleep, physical health, marital satisfaction, and depression. Information regarding service member military characteristics (e.g., branch of service, deployment history) was also available.

Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine, www.aasmnet.org/articles.aspx?id=6313

Suggested Items

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical or health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

Close

  • Useful Tools

    Select a tool below

© 2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.