Caring for Our Communities

Posted Jun 3, 2020

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Resolving community conflict will not happen overnight. Building trust  between differing groups or points of view will take time and ongoing effort. 

  • Don’t rush to judgment. Try to see the situation from multiple points of view.
  • Avoid thinking in an “us” vs. “them” way that makes it harder for people to find common ground.
  • Be sensitive to the religious, cultural, and social backgrounds of your neighbors and co-workers. Recognize that your own biases and stereotypes may influence how you interact with others.
  • Respond to others in your community based on how they behave, not who they are.
  • Think about what you say. Avoid using offensive slang or slurs or language that is derogatory toward others.
  • Be a role model. Set an example for your children, family, and friends. Treat others as you would wish to be treated.
  • Talk to people in your community. Ask them how they are feeling about what’s been going on and listen to their concerns. Ask what changes they think are necessary to resolve the conflict.

Resources

The Culture and Trauma resource kits from the Suicide Prevention Resource Center/National Child
Traumatic Stress Network:  https://www.sprc.org/resources-programs/culture-and-trauma 

Stress and Trauma Toolkit for Treating Historically Marginalized Populations in a Changing
Political and Social Environment:  https://www.psychiatry.org/psychiatrists/cultural-competency/education/stress-and-trauma 

Fact sheet library on Mental Health Disparities and Diverse populations: 
https://www.psychiatry.org/psychiatrists/cultural-competency/education/mental-health-facts 

Source: Empathia, Inc.

Resolving community conflict will not happen overnight. Building trust  between differing groups or points of view will take time and ongoing effort. 

  • Don’t rush to judgment. Try to see the situation from multiple points of view.
  • Avoid thinking in an “us” vs. “them” way that makes it harder for people to find common ground.
  • Be sensitive to the religious, cultural, and social backgrounds of your neighbors and co-workers. Recognize that your own biases and stereotypes may influence how you interact with others.
  • Respond to others in your community based on how they behave, not who they are.
  • Think about what you say. Avoid using offensive slang or slurs or language that is derogatory toward others.
  • Be a role model. Set an example for your children, family, and friends. Treat others as you would wish to be treated.
  • Talk to people in your community. Ask them how they are feeling about what’s been going on and listen to their concerns. Ask what changes they think are necessary to resolve the conflict.

Resources

The Culture and Trauma resource kits from the Suicide Prevention Resource Center/National Child
Traumatic Stress Network:  https://www.sprc.org/resources-programs/culture-and-trauma 

Stress and Trauma Toolkit for Treating Historically Marginalized Populations in a Changing
Political and Social Environment:  https://www.psychiatry.org/psychiatrists/cultural-competency/education/stress-and-trauma 

Fact sheet library on Mental Health Disparities and Diverse populations: 
https://www.psychiatry.org/psychiatrists/cultural-competency/education/mental-health-facts 

Source: Empathia, Inc.

Resolving community conflict will not happen overnight. Building trust  between differing groups or points of view will take time and ongoing effort. 

  • Don’t rush to judgment. Try to see the situation from multiple points of view.
  • Avoid thinking in an “us” vs. “them” way that makes it harder for people to find common ground.
  • Be sensitive to the religious, cultural, and social backgrounds of your neighbors and co-workers. Recognize that your own biases and stereotypes may influence how you interact with others.
  • Respond to others in your community based on how they behave, not who they are.
  • Think about what you say. Avoid using offensive slang or slurs or language that is derogatory toward others.
  • Be a role model. Set an example for your children, family, and friends. Treat others as you would wish to be treated.
  • Talk to people in your community. Ask them how they are feeling about what’s been going on and listen to their concerns. Ask what changes they think are necessary to resolve the conflict.

Resources

The Culture and Trauma resource kits from the Suicide Prevention Resource Center/National Child
Traumatic Stress Network:  https://www.sprc.org/resources-programs/culture-and-trauma 

Stress and Trauma Toolkit for Treating Historically Marginalized Populations in a Changing
Political and Social Environment:  https://www.psychiatry.org/psychiatrists/cultural-competency/education/stress-and-trauma 

Fact sheet library on Mental Health Disparities and Diverse populations: 
https://www.psychiatry.org/psychiatrists/cultural-competency/education/mental-health-facts 

Source: Empathia, Inc.

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, assessments, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological, or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2019 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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