Deciding to Quit Drinking

Posted Jun 14, 2022

Close

E-mail Article

Complete form to e-mail article…

Required fields are denoted by an asterisk (*) adjacent to the label.

Separate multiple recipients with a comma

Close

Sign-Up For Newsletters

Complete this form to sign-up for newsletters…

Required fields are denoted by an asterisk (*) adjacent to the label.

 

Many people with drinking problems cannot tell when their drinking is out of control. You likely have a drinking problem when your body depends on alcohol to function and your drinking is causing problems with your health, social life, family or job. Recognizing that you have a drinking problem is the first step toward being alcohol-free.

Talk with your health care provider about your drinking. They can help you find the best treatment.

Are you ready to change?

You may have tried to stop drinking many times in the past and feel you have no control over it. Or you may be thinking about stopping, but you're not sure if you're ready to start.

Change takes place in stages over time. The first stage is being ready to change. Important stages that follow include:

  • Thinking about the pros and cons of stopping drinking
  • Making small changes and figuring out how to deal with the hard parts, such as what to do when you're in a situation where you would normally drink
  • Stopping drinking
  • Living an alcohol-free life

Many people go back and forth through the stages of change several times before the change really lasts. Plan what you will do if you slip up, and try not to be discouraged.

Lifestyle changes that can help

Here are some tips to help you control your drinking:

  • Stay away from people you normally drink with or places where you would drink.
  • Plan activities you enjoy that do not involve drinking.
  • Keep alcohol out of your home.
  • Follow your plan to handle your urges to drink. Remind yourself why you decided to quit.
  • Talk with someone you trust when you have the urge to drink.
  • Create a polite but firm way of refusing a drink when you are offered one.

Getting help from others

After talking about your drinking with your health care provider or an alcohol counselor, you will likely be referred to an alcohol support group or recovery program. These programs:

  • Teach people about alcohol misuse and its effects
  • Offer counseling and support about how to stay away from alcohol
  • Provide a space where you can talk with others who have drinking problems

You can also seek help and support from:

  • Trusted family members and friends who do not drink
  • Your place of work, which may have a program that can help employees with personal issues such as alcohol use
  • Support groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcohol withdrawal

You may be at risk for symptoms of alcohol withdrawal if you stop drinking suddenly. If you are at risk, you will likely need to be under medical care while you stop drinking. Discuss this with your health care provider. 

Source: U.S. National Institutes of Health, www.nih.gov

Many people with drinking problems cannot tell when their drinking is out of control. You likely have a drinking problem when your body depends on alcohol to function and your drinking is causing problems with your health, social life, family or job. Recognizing that you have a drinking problem is the first step toward being alcohol-free.

Talk with your health care provider about your drinking. They can help you find the best treatment.

Are you ready to change?

You may have tried to stop drinking many times in the past and feel you have no control over it. Or you may be thinking about stopping, but you're not sure if you're ready to start.

Change takes place in stages over time. The first stage is being ready to change. Important stages that follow include:

  • Thinking about the pros and cons of stopping drinking
  • Making small changes and figuring out how to deal with the hard parts, such as what to do when you're in a situation where you would normally drink
  • Stopping drinking
  • Living an alcohol-free life

Many people go back and forth through the stages of change several times before the change really lasts. Plan what you will do if you slip up, and try not to be discouraged.

Lifestyle changes that can help

Here are some tips to help you control your drinking:

  • Stay away from people you normally drink with or places where you would drink.
  • Plan activities you enjoy that do not involve drinking.
  • Keep alcohol out of your home.
  • Follow your plan to handle your urges to drink. Remind yourself why you decided to quit.
  • Talk with someone you trust when you have the urge to drink.
  • Create a polite but firm way of refusing a drink when you are offered one.

Getting help from others

After talking about your drinking with your health care provider or an alcohol counselor, you will likely be referred to an alcohol support group or recovery program. These programs:

  • Teach people about alcohol misuse and its effects
  • Offer counseling and support about how to stay away from alcohol
  • Provide a space where you can talk with others who have drinking problems

You can also seek help and support from:

  • Trusted family members and friends who do not drink
  • Your place of work, which may have a program that can help employees with personal issues such as alcohol use
  • Support groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcohol withdrawal

You may be at risk for symptoms of alcohol withdrawal if you stop drinking suddenly. If you are at risk, you will likely need to be under medical care while you stop drinking. Discuss this with your health care provider. 

Source: U.S. National Institutes of Health, www.nih.gov

Many people with drinking problems cannot tell when their drinking is out of control. You likely have a drinking problem when your body depends on alcohol to function and your drinking is causing problems with your health, social life, family or job. Recognizing that you have a drinking problem is the first step toward being alcohol-free.

Talk with your health care provider about your drinking. They can help you find the best treatment.

Are you ready to change?

You may have tried to stop drinking many times in the past and feel you have no control over it. Or you may be thinking about stopping, but you're not sure if you're ready to start.

Change takes place in stages over time. The first stage is being ready to change. Important stages that follow include:

  • Thinking about the pros and cons of stopping drinking
  • Making small changes and figuring out how to deal with the hard parts, such as what to do when you're in a situation where you would normally drink
  • Stopping drinking
  • Living an alcohol-free life

Many people go back and forth through the stages of change several times before the change really lasts. Plan what you will do if you slip up, and try not to be discouraged.

Lifestyle changes that can help

Here are some tips to help you control your drinking:

  • Stay away from people you normally drink with or places where you would drink.
  • Plan activities you enjoy that do not involve drinking.
  • Keep alcohol out of your home.
  • Follow your plan to handle your urges to drink. Remind yourself why you decided to quit.
  • Talk with someone you trust when you have the urge to drink.
  • Create a polite but firm way of refusing a drink when you are offered one.

Getting help from others

After talking about your drinking with your health care provider or an alcohol counselor, you will likely be referred to an alcohol support group or recovery program. These programs:

  • Teach people about alcohol misuse and its effects
  • Offer counseling and support about how to stay away from alcohol
  • Provide a space where you can talk with others who have drinking problems

You can also seek help and support from:

  • Trusted family members and friends who do not drink
  • Your place of work, which may have a program that can help employees with personal issues such as alcohol use
  • Support groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcohol withdrawal

You may be at risk for symptoms of alcohol withdrawal if you stop drinking suddenly. If you are at risk, you will likely need to be under medical care while you stop drinking. Discuss this with your health care provider. 

Source: U.S. National Institutes of Health, www.nih.gov

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, assessments, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological, or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  

 

Close

  • Useful Tools

    Select a tool below

© 2023 Beacon Health Options, Inc.