Understanding Oppositional Disorders (ODD)

Reviewed Jun 30, 2017

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Summary

Signs of ODD include:

  • Regular temper tantrums or angry outbursts.
  • Going out of their way to irritate or provoke others.
  • Failure to take responsibility for own mistakes and actions.

At one time or another, all children get angry. They may argue, throw tantrums, or talk back to teachers. They may disobey parents and authority figures on purpose. In fact, at some ages, this is a normal developmental trait. Toddlers and young teens become hostile from time-to-time to help them separate from their parents. This fighting back helps them gain their independence.

Yet some children become hostile and fight back in a way that is far out of line with other children. This can cause severe problems at school or in the family. This may be oppositional disorder (ODD). If this is the case, treatment may help your child. Some common signs of this disorder include:

  • Regular temper tantrums or angry outbursts
  • Going out of their way to irritate or provoke others
  • Failure to learn from their own mistakes
  • Failure to take responsibility for own mistakes and actions
  • Lying to get out of trouble
  • Lying to get attention
  • Refusing to comply with requests from adults or teachers
  • Saying mean and hateful things to others on purpose

Tips for parents

  • Set reasonable limits and penalties for certain actions in the home. Learn skills that will help you manage your own anger and frustration. Usually, giving discipline when you are angry is not successful. If you are too angry to deal with a situation, take a time out.
  • Don’t bully, humiliate, or threaten your child. This will not make him behave. This does not work and may only serve to create an environment where the anger feeds on itself. When a child is shamed, he may feel threatened. He may feel compelled to fight back.
  • Don’t forget your child’s positive qualities. Adults tend to focus on the child’s negative qualities. This happens because the child’s behavior is often negative. Instead, learn to see when your child does something positive. Reinforce these things by giving praise. Use rewards that are important to the child.
  • Parenting a child with ODD can be challenging. It can also be very frustrating so it is important to get support for yourself. It is also important to get support for other family members. Join a parent support or a church group. Take part in some other activity that will help you gain back your emotional strength. Get professional help.
  • Take time out for yourself and your spouse. Make a special date with your spouse if you have to.
By Haline Grublak, CPHQ
Reviewed by Philip Merideth, MD, Peer Advisor, Beacon Health Options

Summary

Signs of ODD include:

  • Regular temper tantrums or angry outbursts.
  • Going out of their way to irritate or provoke others.
  • Failure to take responsibility for own mistakes and actions.

At one time or another, all children get angry. They may argue, throw tantrums, or talk back to teachers. They may disobey parents and authority figures on purpose. In fact, at some ages, this is a normal developmental trait. Toddlers and young teens become hostile from time-to-time to help them separate from their parents. This fighting back helps them gain their independence.

Yet some children become hostile and fight back in a way that is far out of line with other children. This can cause severe problems at school or in the family. This may be oppositional disorder (ODD). If this is the case, treatment may help your child. Some common signs of this disorder include:

  • Regular temper tantrums or angry outbursts
  • Going out of their way to irritate or provoke others
  • Failure to learn from their own mistakes
  • Failure to take responsibility for own mistakes and actions
  • Lying to get out of trouble
  • Lying to get attention
  • Refusing to comply with requests from adults or teachers
  • Saying mean and hateful things to others on purpose

Tips for parents

  • Set reasonable limits and penalties for certain actions in the home. Learn skills that will help you manage your own anger and frustration. Usually, giving discipline when you are angry is not successful. If you are too angry to deal with a situation, take a time out.
  • Don’t bully, humiliate, or threaten your child. This will not make him behave. This does not work and may only serve to create an environment where the anger feeds on itself. When a child is shamed, he may feel threatened. He may feel compelled to fight back.
  • Don’t forget your child’s positive qualities. Adults tend to focus on the child’s negative qualities. This happens because the child’s behavior is often negative. Instead, learn to see when your child does something positive. Reinforce these things by giving praise. Use rewards that are important to the child.
  • Parenting a child with ODD can be challenging. It can also be very frustrating so it is important to get support for yourself. It is also important to get support for other family members. Join a parent support or a church group. Take part in some other activity that will help you gain back your emotional strength. Get professional help.
  • Take time out for yourself and your spouse. Make a special date with your spouse if you have to.
By Haline Grublak, CPHQ
Reviewed by Philip Merideth, MD, Peer Advisor, Beacon Health Options

Summary

Signs of ODD include:

  • Regular temper tantrums or angry outbursts.
  • Going out of their way to irritate or provoke others.
  • Failure to take responsibility for own mistakes and actions.

At one time or another, all children get angry. They may argue, throw tantrums, or talk back to teachers. They may disobey parents and authority figures on purpose. In fact, at some ages, this is a normal developmental trait. Toddlers and young teens become hostile from time-to-time to help them separate from their parents. This fighting back helps them gain their independence.

Yet some children become hostile and fight back in a way that is far out of line with other children. This can cause severe problems at school or in the family. This may be oppositional disorder (ODD). If this is the case, treatment may help your child. Some common signs of this disorder include:

  • Regular temper tantrums or angry outbursts
  • Going out of their way to irritate or provoke others
  • Failure to learn from their own mistakes
  • Failure to take responsibility for own mistakes and actions
  • Lying to get out of trouble
  • Lying to get attention
  • Refusing to comply with requests from adults or teachers
  • Saying mean and hateful things to others on purpose

Tips for parents

  • Set reasonable limits and penalties for certain actions in the home. Learn skills that will help you manage your own anger and frustration. Usually, giving discipline when you are angry is not successful. If you are too angry to deal with a situation, take a time out.
  • Don’t bully, humiliate, or threaten your child. This will not make him behave. This does not work and may only serve to create an environment where the anger feeds on itself. When a child is shamed, he may feel threatened. He may feel compelled to fight back.
  • Don’t forget your child’s positive qualities. Adults tend to focus on the child’s negative qualities. This happens because the child’s behavior is often negative. Instead, learn to see when your child does something positive. Reinforce these things by giving praise. Use rewards that are important to the child.
  • Parenting a child with ODD can be challenging. It can also be very frustrating so it is important to get support for yourself. It is also important to get support for other family members. Join a parent support or a church group. Take part in some other activity that will help you gain back your emotional strength. Get professional help.
  • Take time out for yourself and your spouse. Make a special date with your spouse if you have to.
By Haline Grublak, CPHQ
Reviewed by Philip Merideth, MD, Peer Advisor, Beacon Health Options

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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