Understanding Conduct Disorders

Reviewed Jun 30, 2017

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Summary

Symptoms of conduct disorder include:

  • Hostility toward others.
  • Destroying property.
  • Lying, stealing, or shoplifting.

What are conduct disorders?

Children with these disorders often violate the basic rights of others. They break major rules. They may become involved in criminal acts. They may act in a way that is dangerous to themselves or to others. Unfortunately, many people in authority don’t view these children as having a mental health problem. Instead, they are seen as juvenile delinquents. They are thought to be bad kids.

Many of the kids in the juvenile justice system may have a conduct disorder. In fact, it is thought more than over half of all children in the juvenile justice system are dealing with a mental health issue. Many are not getting any treatment while there.

Symptoms of a conduct disorder include:

  • Hostility toward others. This is shown in a way that threatens or hurts others. Examples include harming animals, bullying or assaulting others, use of weapons.
  • Destroying property. Examples include setting fires or breaking things on purpose. It can also include damage to property or breaking into a home or business.
  • Lying, stealing, or shoplifting.
  • Running away from home overnight.
  • Refusing to attend school.

These behaviors are serious. They can lead to long-term penalties. They can cause a child to drop out of school and even go to jail. So, it is important to get treatment for your child. If your child ends up in the legal system because of this disorder, you need to advocate for him. By being his advocate, you will ensure he gets treatment while he is in jail or detention.

By Haline Grublak, CPHQ
Reviewed by Philip Merideth, MD, Peer Advisor, Beacon Health Options

Summary

Symptoms of conduct disorder include:

  • Hostility toward others.
  • Destroying property.
  • Lying, stealing, or shoplifting.

What are conduct disorders?

Children with these disorders often violate the basic rights of others. They break major rules. They may become involved in criminal acts. They may act in a way that is dangerous to themselves or to others. Unfortunately, many people in authority don’t view these children as having a mental health problem. Instead, they are seen as juvenile delinquents. They are thought to be bad kids.

Many of the kids in the juvenile justice system may have a conduct disorder. In fact, it is thought more than over half of all children in the juvenile justice system are dealing with a mental health issue. Many are not getting any treatment while there.

Symptoms of a conduct disorder include:

  • Hostility toward others. This is shown in a way that threatens or hurts others. Examples include harming animals, bullying or assaulting others, use of weapons.
  • Destroying property. Examples include setting fires or breaking things on purpose. It can also include damage to property or breaking into a home or business.
  • Lying, stealing, or shoplifting.
  • Running away from home overnight.
  • Refusing to attend school.

These behaviors are serious. They can lead to long-term penalties. They can cause a child to drop out of school and even go to jail. So, it is important to get treatment for your child. If your child ends up in the legal system because of this disorder, you need to advocate for him. By being his advocate, you will ensure he gets treatment while he is in jail or detention.

By Haline Grublak, CPHQ
Reviewed by Philip Merideth, MD, Peer Advisor, Beacon Health Options

Summary

Symptoms of conduct disorder include:

  • Hostility toward others.
  • Destroying property.
  • Lying, stealing, or shoplifting.

What are conduct disorders?

Children with these disorders often violate the basic rights of others. They break major rules. They may become involved in criminal acts. They may act in a way that is dangerous to themselves or to others. Unfortunately, many people in authority don’t view these children as having a mental health problem. Instead, they are seen as juvenile delinquents. They are thought to be bad kids.

Many of the kids in the juvenile justice system may have a conduct disorder. In fact, it is thought more than over half of all children in the juvenile justice system are dealing with a mental health issue. Many are not getting any treatment while there.

Symptoms of a conduct disorder include:

  • Hostility toward others. This is shown in a way that threatens or hurts others. Examples include harming animals, bullying or assaulting others, use of weapons.
  • Destroying property. Examples include setting fires or breaking things on purpose. It can also include damage to property or breaking into a home or business.
  • Lying, stealing, or shoplifting.
  • Running away from home overnight.
  • Refusing to attend school.

These behaviors are serious. They can lead to long-term penalties. They can cause a child to drop out of school and even go to jail. So, it is important to get treatment for your child. If your child ends up in the legal system because of this disorder, you need to advocate for him. By being his advocate, you will ensure he gets treatment while he is in jail or detention.

By Haline Grublak, CPHQ
Reviewed by Philip Merideth, MD, Peer Advisor, Beacon Health Options

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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