Accepting the Body You Have

Reviewed Nov 22, 2016

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Summary

  • Eat normally.
  • Embrace your uniqueness.
  • Treat your body well with exercise.
  • Think positively about yourself and others.

Most women don’t have the ideal body type portrayed by the media, and at least half of all women and girls in the U.S. are believed to eat in a dysfunctional fashion. Men and women both experience pressure to achieve an unrealistic physical ideal, while the diet industry profits from our national preoccupation with size and body weight. But you can learn to accept and enjoy your remarkable body—just as it is. Here are some suggestions:
 
Stop dieting

 
Instead of dieting, start eating normally. What’s normal eating? Eating when you’re hungry, listening to your body, and stopping when you feel full. If dieting leaves you unsatisfied and frustrated, try eating regular meals (typically three) at the same time each day and snacking once or twice if you’re hungry.
 
Focus on the total person
 
You are more than how you look or a collection of individual body parts. Instead of focusing on particular physical features that bother you remember that you are a unique person with a range of special gifts and talents. Do you have a knack with computers or helping others? Do you enjoy singing in a choir? Find time to discover your gifts and talents and experiment with activities that make you feel good about yourself.
 
Enjoy your body
 
The greatest lifestyle improvement is for sedentary people to become active. Treat your body well. Instead of exercising to reach a target weight, exercise to become active and savor the joy of movement for its own sake. Spend a few minutes walking with a friend each day or look for small opportunities to become more active: Take the stairs instead of the elevator or deliberately park as far as possible from the entrance to a store. Have fun being physical without worrying so much about your weight.
 
Practice positive thinking
 
Positive thinking is an essential part of healthy living, directly affecting our physical and mental well-being. Can’t take a compliment? Practice by complimenting yourself each day. Focus on your achievements, skills, and lifestyle choices. Establish a support network of positive thinkers, and avoid those who remain focused on physical appearances. Accept who you are, and be thankful for all you have.
 
Respect others
 
Respect all people, regardless of size. Resist judgment of those who are overweight. Many overweight people are happy with their lives. It is one’s character and relationships that are the foundation of a positive self-worth and meaningful life.

By Lauren Greenwood
Reviewed by Maria F Rodowski-Stanco, MD, Associate Medical Director, Beacon Health Options

Summary

  • Eat normally.
  • Embrace your uniqueness.
  • Treat your body well with exercise.
  • Think positively about yourself and others.

Most women don’t have the ideal body type portrayed by the media, and at least half of all women and girls in the U.S. are believed to eat in a dysfunctional fashion. Men and women both experience pressure to achieve an unrealistic physical ideal, while the diet industry profits from our national preoccupation with size and body weight. But you can learn to accept and enjoy your remarkable body—just as it is. Here are some suggestions:
 
Stop dieting

 
Instead of dieting, start eating normally. What’s normal eating? Eating when you’re hungry, listening to your body, and stopping when you feel full. If dieting leaves you unsatisfied and frustrated, try eating regular meals (typically three) at the same time each day and snacking once or twice if you’re hungry.
 
Focus on the total person
 
You are more than how you look or a collection of individual body parts. Instead of focusing on particular physical features that bother you remember that you are a unique person with a range of special gifts and talents. Do you have a knack with computers or helping others? Do you enjoy singing in a choir? Find time to discover your gifts and talents and experiment with activities that make you feel good about yourself.
 
Enjoy your body
 
The greatest lifestyle improvement is for sedentary people to become active. Treat your body well. Instead of exercising to reach a target weight, exercise to become active and savor the joy of movement for its own sake. Spend a few minutes walking with a friend each day or look for small opportunities to become more active: Take the stairs instead of the elevator or deliberately park as far as possible from the entrance to a store. Have fun being physical without worrying so much about your weight.
 
Practice positive thinking
 
Positive thinking is an essential part of healthy living, directly affecting our physical and mental well-being. Can’t take a compliment? Practice by complimenting yourself each day. Focus on your achievements, skills, and lifestyle choices. Establish a support network of positive thinkers, and avoid those who remain focused on physical appearances. Accept who you are, and be thankful for all you have.
 
Respect others
 
Respect all people, regardless of size. Resist judgment of those who are overweight. Many overweight people are happy with their lives. It is one’s character and relationships that are the foundation of a positive self-worth and meaningful life.

By Lauren Greenwood
Reviewed by Maria F Rodowski-Stanco, MD, Associate Medical Director, Beacon Health Options

Summary

  • Eat normally.
  • Embrace your uniqueness.
  • Treat your body well with exercise.
  • Think positively about yourself and others.

Most women don’t have the ideal body type portrayed by the media, and at least half of all women and girls in the U.S. are believed to eat in a dysfunctional fashion. Men and women both experience pressure to achieve an unrealistic physical ideal, while the diet industry profits from our national preoccupation with size and body weight. But you can learn to accept and enjoy your remarkable body—just as it is. Here are some suggestions:
 
Stop dieting

 
Instead of dieting, start eating normally. What’s normal eating? Eating when you’re hungry, listening to your body, and stopping when you feel full. If dieting leaves you unsatisfied and frustrated, try eating regular meals (typically three) at the same time each day and snacking once or twice if you’re hungry.
 
Focus on the total person
 
You are more than how you look or a collection of individual body parts. Instead of focusing on particular physical features that bother you remember that you are a unique person with a range of special gifts and talents. Do you have a knack with computers or helping others? Do you enjoy singing in a choir? Find time to discover your gifts and talents and experiment with activities that make you feel good about yourself.
 
Enjoy your body
 
The greatest lifestyle improvement is for sedentary people to become active. Treat your body well. Instead of exercising to reach a target weight, exercise to become active and savor the joy of movement for its own sake. Spend a few minutes walking with a friend each day or look for small opportunities to become more active: Take the stairs instead of the elevator or deliberately park as far as possible from the entrance to a store. Have fun being physical without worrying so much about your weight.
 
Practice positive thinking
 
Positive thinking is an essential part of healthy living, directly affecting our physical and mental well-being. Can’t take a compliment? Practice by complimenting yourself each day. Focus on your achievements, skills, and lifestyle choices. Establish a support network of positive thinkers, and avoid those who remain focused on physical appearances. Accept who you are, and be thankful for all you have.
 
Respect others
 
Respect all people, regardless of size. Resist judgment of those who are overweight. Many overweight people are happy with their lives. It is one’s character and relationships that are the foundation of a positive self-worth and meaningful life.

By Lauren Greenwood
Reviewed by Maria F Rodowski-Stanco, MD, Associate Medical Director, Beacon Health Options

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical or health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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