Making a Health Behavior Change: 'I Know What I Need to Do, I Just Can't Seem to Get There'

Reviewed May 15, 2019

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Summary

  • Think about your reasons for getting healthier.
  • Decide on a plan that will work in your life and stick to it.

Identifying negative thought patterns and coming up with a plan for solution-oriented, positive thinking can make a difference in knowing what to do and in creating healthy habits.

Mind game #1: “This is too hard. It takes too much work.”

Solution: Think about your reasons for getting healthier—what’s in it for you? Do you want to lose weight, lower your cholesterol and blood pressure, cut your meds, sleep better, have more energy, get into a certain clothing size, run a race? Writing a “wellness vision” that has the results you want to reach can help beat the “too much work” game. 

Mind game #2: “It’s taking too long. I don’t see results!”

Solution: It took time to get where you are and it will take time to get where you want to be. For results to be lasting, time is needed to shift your thinking so you can make new habits. Focus on improvements and small accomplishments, like a 10 percent weight loss or being able to walk three miles in less time.

Mind game #3: “I’ve tried everything to lose weight and nothing seems to work.”

Solution: Decide on an eating and exercise plan that will work in your life and make a choice to stick with it. Start with a realistic, daily calorie goal that allows for foods that keep you from feeling deprived. If you don’t like to exercise, find ways to add activity in your day: take the stairs, quit circling for the closest parking space, take a 15-minute walking break at work. When the “nothing works” thought starts in your head, hit back with “I knew you’d start again. I’m not listening to you anymore. This plan will work and I’m going to stay with it!”

Mind game #4: “I’ll do it when I am ready!”

Solution: “You can’t make me” keeps the focus on the power struggle you are having with someone else, instead of focusing on what you need to do for yourself. Step out of the power struggle and take care of yourself. For change to happen, you may need to plan and get prepared: Gather info and start small. Any step in a positive direction makes change.

Mind game #5: “Yes, I know that would help, but I don’t have time.”

Solution: Stop yourself from saying “Yes (I know that would help), but I can’t because (your excuse).” Find a way to get started. Get support. Meet with a dietician, a trainer, a health coach. Join a support group. Set a time to walk or work out with a friend. Get info from websites or books. Prioritize your health and tell yourself you are worth it.

By Kristen Hooks, M.Ed., L.P.C., L.M.F.T., C.E.A.P., Certified Wellness Coach

Summary

  • Think about your reasons for getting healthier.
  • Decide on a plan that will work in your life and stick to it.

Identifying negative thought patterns and coming up with a plan for solution-oriented, positive thinking can make a difference in knowing what to do and in creating healthy habits.

Mind game #1: “This is too hard. It takes too much work.”

Solution: Think about your reasons for getting healthier—what’s in it for you? Do you want to lose weight, lower your cholesterol and blood pressure, cut your meds, sleep better, have more energy, get into a certain clothing size, run a race? Writing a “wellness vision” that has the results you want to reach can help beat the “too much work” game. 

Mind game #2: “It’s taking too long. I don’t see results!”

Solution: It took time to get where you are and it will take time to get where you want to be. For results to be lasting, time is needed to shift your thinking so you can make new habits. Focus on improvements and small accomplishments, like a 10 percent weight loss or being able to walk three miles in less time.

Mind game #3: “I’ve tried everything to lose weight and nothing seems to work.”

Solution: Decide on an eating and exercise plan that will work in your life and make a choice to stick with it. Start with a realistic, daily calorie goal that allows for foods that keep you from feeling deprived. If you don’t like to exercise, find ways to add activity in your day: take the stairs, quit circling for the closest parking space, take a 15-minute walking break at work. When the “nothing works” thought starts in your head, hit back with “I knew you’d start again. I’m not listening to you anymore. This plan will work and I’m going to stay with it!”

Mind game #4: “I’ll do it when I am ready!”

Solution: “You can’t make me” keeps the focus on the power struggle you are having with someone else, instead of focusing on what you need to do for yourself. Step out of the power struggle and take care of yourself. For change to happen, you may need to plan and get prepared: Gather info and start small. Any step in a positive direction makes change.

Mind game #5: “Yes, I know that would help, but I don’t have time.”

Solution: Stop yourself from saying “Yes (I know that would help), but I can’t because (your excuse).” Find a way to get started. Get support. Meet with a dietician, a trainer, a health coach. Join a support group. Set a time to walk or work out with a friend. Get info from websites or books. Prioritize your health and tell yourself you are worth it.

By Kristen Hooks, M.Ed., L.P.C., L.M.F.T., C.E.A.P., Certified Wellness Coach

Summary

  • Think about your reasons for getting healthier.
  • Decide on a plan that will work in your life and stick to it.

Identifying negative thought patterns and coming up with a plan for solution-oriented, positive thinking can make a difference in knowing what to do and in creating healthy habits.

Mind game #1: “This is too hard. It takes too much work.”

Solution: Think about your reasons for getting healthier—what’s in it for you? Do you want to lose weight, lower your cholesterol and blood pressure, cut your meds, sleep better, have more energy, get into a certain clothing size, run a race? Writing a “wellness vision” that has the results you want to reach can help beat the “too much work” game. 

Mind game #2: “It’s taking too long. I don’t see results!”

Solution: It took time to get where you are and it will take time to get where you want to be. For results to be lasting, time is needed to shift your thinking so you can make new habits. Focus on improvements and small accomplishments, like a 10 percent weight loss or being able to walk three miles in less time.

Mind game #3: “I’ve tried everything to lose weight and nothing seems to work.”

Solution: Decide on an eating and exercise plan that will work in your life and make a choice to stick with it. Start with a realistic, daily calorie goal that allows for foods that keep you from feeling deprived. If you don’t like to exercise, find ways to add activity in your day: take the stairs, quit circling for the closest parking space, take a 15-minute walking break at work. When the “nothing works” thought starts in your head, hit back with “I knew you’d start again. I’m not listening to you anymore. This plan will work and I’m going to stay with it!”

Mind game #4: “I’ll do it when I am ready!”

Solution: “You can’t make me” keeps the focus on the power struggle you are having with someone else, instead of focusing on what you need to do for yourself. Step out of the power struggle and take care of yourself. For change to happen, you may need to plan and get prepared: Gather info and start small. Any step in a positive direction makes change.

Mind game #5: “Yes, I know that would help, but I don’t have time.”

Solution: Stop yourself from saying “Yes (I know that would help), but I can’t because (your excuse).” Find a way to get started. Get support. Meet with a dietician, a trainer, a health coach. Join a support group. Set a time to walk or work out with a friend. Get info from websites or books. Prioritize your health and tell yourself you are worth it.

By Kristen Hooks, M.Ed., L.P.C., L.M.F.T., C.E.A.P., Certified Wellness Coach

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, assessments, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical or health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2019 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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