How Families Can Help With Transition Planning

Reviewed Jun 22, 2021

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Summary

Questions for your child:

  • What kind of job or career do they want?
  • How will they get medical care?
  • What other help do they need to live on their own?

When planning for your child to receive adult care, you should work with your child to make the move from school to adult life. Your child may still have an Individual Education Plan (IEP). This would be used if your child goes on to college.

You might want to begin by talking to your child and finding out:

What do they want to do?

Talk to your child. Learn what her goals are. Find out what they like to do and what they can do. Learn what you can do to help them reach their goals. Find out what other kinds of help they will need to reach their goals.

What kind of job or career do they want?

Talk to teachers and counselors. They will help you to know what is realistic for your child. If they are able to handle the workload, you may want to support them if they want to get a part-time job while still in high school. This type of job may be the right fit for many teens that are moving into adulthood.

For children who have disabilities, many companies have supported employment. This gives persons with disabilities the chance to work in the community. Many community mental health centers have job coaches who can help your child find a job. They may be able to connect him with supported employment.

Where will they live?

It’s not too early to think about where they will live after high school. It may be fine for them to stay at home for a while. On the other hand, they may want to get an apartment. They may want to live with a roommate. Some young people will do better in group homes. Others do better in residential facilities. You need to find out what’s on hand in your community.

How will they support themself?

They may not be able to support himself on wages from a job. He may need additional help. If he has a disability, find out if he qualifies for Social Security Income (SSI). He may qualify for other assistance programs such as food stamps.

How will they get medical care?

If your child is covered by Medicaid, find out what needs to be done to make sure it continues when they turn 18. Don’t wait until their 18th birthday to do this, because you don’t want to have any gaps in theri medical coverage. If they are not Medicaid eligible, read your health insurance policy. Health care laws allow children to be covered by their parent’s policies until they turn 26.

What other help do they need to live on their own?

Help them learn about handling money. You can do this by giving them an allowance. You can also help them work out a budget when they get a job. Boys need to register for the draft.

What kind of social life will they have when they leave school?

Talk to them about dating, marriage and family planning. Find out how they plan to make friends. Encourage them to become involved in their faith community, social clubs or other activities that they like.

By Haline Grublak

Summary

Questions for your child:

  • What kind of job or career do they want?
  • How will they get medical care?
  • What other help do they need to live on their own?

When planning for your child to receive adult care, you should work with your child to make the move from school to adult life. Your child may still have an Individual Education Plan (IEP). This would be used if your child goes on to college.

You might want to begin by talking to your child and finding out:

What do they want to do?

Talk to your child. Learn what her goals are. Find out what they like to do and what they can do. Learn what you can do to help them reach their goals. Find out what other kinds of help they will need to reach their goals.

What kind of job or career do they want?

Talk to teachers and counselors. They will help you to know what is realistic for your child. If they are able to handle the workload, you may want to support them if they want to get a part-time job while still in high school. This type of job may be the right fit for many teens that are moving into adulthood.

For children who have disabilities, many companies have supported employment. This gives persons with disabilities the chance to work in the community. Many community mental health centers have job coaches who can help your child find a job. They may be able to connect him with supported employment.

Where will they live?

It’s not too early to think about where they will live after high school. It may be fine for them to stay at home for a while. On the other hand, they may want to get an apartment. They may want to live with a roommate. Some young people will do better in group homes. Others do better in residential facilities. You need to find out what’s on hand in your community.

How will they support themself?

They may not be able to support himself on wages from a job. He may need additional help. If he has a disability, find out if he qualifies for Social Security Income (SSI). He may qualify for other assistance programs such as food stamps.

How will they get medical care?

If your child is covered by Medicaid, find out what needs to be done to make sure it continues when they turn 18. Don’t wait until their 18th birthday to do this, because you don’t want to have any gaps in theri medical coverage. If they are not Medicaid eligible, read your health insurance policy. Health care laws allow children to be covered by their parent’s policies until they turn 26.

What other help do they need to live on their own?

Help them learn about handling money. You can do this by giving them an allowance. You can also help them work out a budget when they get a job. Boys need to register for the draft.

What kind of social life will they have when they leave school?

Talk to them about dating, marriage and family planning. Find out how they plan to make friends. Encourage them to become involved in their faith community, social clubs or other activities that they like.

By Haline Grublak

Summary

Questions for your child:

  • What kind of job or career do they want?
  • How will they get medical care?
  • What other help do they need to live on their own?

When planning for your child to receive adult care, you should work with your child to make the move from school to adult life. Your child may still have an Individual Education Plan (IEP). This would be used if your child goes on to college.

You might want to begin by talking to your child and finding out:

What do they want to do?

Talk to your child. Learn what her goals are. Find out what they like to do and what they can do. Learn what you can do to help them reach their goals. Find out what other kinds of help they will need to reach their goals.

What kind of job or career do they want?

Talk to teachers and counselors. They will help you to know what is realistic for your child. If they are able to handle the workload, you may want to support them if they want to get a part-time job while still in high school. This type of job may be the right fit for many teens that are moving into adulthood.

For children who have disabilities, many companies have supported employment. This gives persons with disabilities the chance to work in the community. Many community mental health centers have job coaches who can help your child find a job. They may be able to connect him with supported employment.

Where will they live?

It’s not too early to think about where they will live after high school. It may be fine for them to stay at home for a while. On the other hand, they may want to get an apartment. They may want to live with a roommate. Some young people will do better in group homes. Others do better in residential facilities. You need to find out what’s on hand in your community.

How will they support themself?

They may not be able to support himself on wages from a job. He may need additional help. If he has a disability, find out if he qualifies for Social Security Income (SSI). He may qualify for other assistance programs such as food stamps.

How will they get medical care?

If your child is covered by Medicaid, find out what needs to be done to make sure it continues when they turn 18. Don’t wait until their 18th birthday to do this, because you don’t want to have any gaps in theri medical coverage. If they are not Medicaid eligible, read your health insurance policy. Health care laws allow children to be covered by their parent’s policies until they turn 26.

What other help do they need to live on their own?

Help them learn about handling money. You can do this by giving them an allowance. You can also help them work out a budget when they get a job. Boys need to register for the draft.

What kind of social life will they have when they leave school?

Talk to them about dating, marriage and family planning. Find out how they plan to make friends. Encourage them to become involved in their faith community, social clubs or other activities that they like.

By Haline Grublak

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, assessments, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological, or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  

 

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