What Is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)?

Reviewed Oct 18, 2018

Close

E-mail Article

Complete form to e-mail article…

Required fields are denoted by an asterisk (*) adjacent to the label.

Separate multiple recipients with a comma

Close

Sign-Up For Newsletters

Complete this form to sign-up for newsletters…

Required fields are denoted by an asterisk (*) adjacent to the label.

 

Summary

A few of the IDEA principles:

  • A free and appropriate education
  • Individualized education plan (IEP)
  • Procedural safeguards

Before the 1960s, schools didn’t have to teach kids with disabilities until the Civil Rights Act was passed. It protects people who are part of a minority group. This includes people with disabilities. Now, all children have the right to get an education. One of the most important laws that protect children with disabilities is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

The IDEA principles

There are six IDEA principles that guide schools. They also guide how schools give and assess the special education services. These principles are:

  1. A free and appropriate education. Kids with disabilities are allowed to have a no cost education that is right for the child’s needs.
  2. An appropriate evaluation. Before a school can give education that is right for the child, a school must first find out what is right. They do this by testing the child. They measure the child’s abilities. This gives the school a clear picture of the child’s specific needs.
  3. Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The IEP assures that a child will get the right schooling. The IEP is a written plan. It lists the changes that need to be made in your child's school setting. These changes are planned to help him get the best education. It is put together by school staff, parents, and others who have the child’s best interests at heart. Sometimes, the child is also part of the planning. It is like a care plan or a treatment plan in a mental health setting. But, an IEP applies to your child’s schooling.
  4. Least restrictive environment. The IDEA ensures each child with a disability gets a free education. It needs to be in the least restrictive setting. The IEP process will help decide if the child is best served in the normal classroom. They may be better served in another school setting. It is the school’s duty to give an alternate setting.
  5. Parent and student participation in the IEP. This ensures the right of the student and the parents to be part of the IEP.
  6. Procedural safeguards. There are safeguards built into the law that protect the rights of parents and students. The school must tell the parent about any action it plans to take in planning the child’s IEP. Parents have the right to see all of their child’s records. There must be a process in place for parents to use to complain if there is a problem with the IEP.

IDEA is not meant to give care to children. It is a promise that the school will educate kids with disabilities. It is designed so that they can get the most from school.

To be able to have special education services, a child must have a disability. Not all mental health issues are seen as a disability. Only those mental health issues that get in the way of one or more life activities qualify. Contact ADA National Network (http://adata.org/) for more helpful info.

Rights under the IDEA

  • A free and fitting public education. This applies from the age of 6 through 18.
  • Access to the same types of programs and services that other children have.
  • Being placed in the least restrictive learning setting. This should be done, if possible, at the same school the child would normally go to.
  • Another learning setting, if going to a local public school is not possible.
  • Appointing a person to act as a parent proxy. This person should be allowed to take part in the IEP meeting if the parents can’t.
  • Taking part in the drafting of the IEP.
  • Placement outside the school district in another school. The child should be able to go to a public or private school, at public expense, if local schools do not have the right program.
  • Once a year review of placement.
  • Privacy and confidentiality of all records.

Parent’s rights under the IDEA

  • Take part in the review of your child’s IEP.
  • Agree to a time and place for those meetings.
  • Ask the local school agency to hold these meetings in your first language. You may also make special planning for any disability you or your spouse may have.
  • Give the okay before any review is conducted.
  • Receive a copy of the report.
  • Get separate testing of your child at public expense. This can be done if you have questions about the quality of the schools’ review. The school may ask for a hearing to decide the correctness of its own test.
  • Give written okay to any actions proposed for your child.
  • Get written notice of any proposed change to the IEP. You should also be told if the school refuses to make a change to the IEP that you asked for.
  • Come to and make comments at the annual public hearing. This is held for the state’s special education plan.
  • Check and if needed, dispute your child’s records. This is done in keeping with the Family Educational Rights Act.

Parents may also disagree and refuse consent to the actions listed below:

  • Fixing or changing items in your child’s files
  • Evaluating your child
  • Placing your child in a special education program
  • Getting more info from an outside source about your child
  • Giving info from the school to another person about your child
  • Changing the special program that your child is in
  • Taking your child out of the special program
By Haline Grublak, Vice President of Member and Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, C.R.S.S., C.P.R.S., Wellness & Recovery Program Manager, Beacon Health Options

Summary

A few of the IDEA principles:

  • A free and appropriate education
  • Individualized education plan (IEP)
  • Procedural safeguards

Before the 1960s, schools didn’t have to teach kids with disabilities until the Civil Rights Act was passed. It protects people who are part of a minority group. This includes people with disabilities. Now, all children have the right to get an education. One of the most important laws that protect children with disabilities is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

The IDEA principles

There are six IDEA principles that guide schools. They also guide how schools give and assess the special education services. These principles are:

  1. A free and appropriate education. Kids with disabilities are allowed to have a no cost education that is right for the child’s needs.
  2. An appropriate evaluation. Before a school can give education that is right for the child, a school must first find out what is right. They do this by testing the child. They measure the child’s abilities. This gives the school a clear picture of the child’s specific needs.
  3. Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The IEP assures that a child will get the right schooling. The IEP is a written plan. It lists the changes that need to be made in your child's school setting. These changes are planned to help him get the best education. It is put together by school staff, parents, and others who have the child’s best interests at heart. Sometimes, the child is also part of the planning. It is like a care plan or a treatment plan in a mental health setting. But, an IEP applies to your child’s schooling.
  4. Least restrictive environment. The IDEA ensures each child with a disability gets a free education. It needs to be in the least restrictive setting. The IEP process will help decide if the child is best served in the normal classroom. They may be better served in another school setting. It is the school’s duty to give an alternate setting.
  5. Parent and student participation in the IEP. This ensures the right of the student and the parents to be part of the IEP.
  6. Procedural safeguards. There are safeguards built into the law that protect the rights of parents and students. The school must tell the parent about any action it plans to take in planning the child’s IEP. Parents have the right to see all of their child’s records. There must be a process in place for parents to use to complain if there is a problem with the IEP.

IDEA is not meant to give care to children. It is a promise that the school will educate kids with disabilities. It is designed so that they can get the most from school.

To be able to have special education services, a child must have a disability. Not all mental health issues are seen as a disability. Only those mental health issues that get in the way of one or more life activities qualify. Contact ADA National Network (http://adata.org/) for more helpful info.

Rights under the IDEA

  • A free and fitting public education. This applies from the age of 6 through 18.
  • Access to the same types of programs and services that other children have.
  • Being placed in the least restrictive learning setting. This should be done, if possible, at the same school the child would normally go to.
  • Another learning setting, if going to a local public school is not possible.
  • Appointing a person to act as a parent proxy. This person should be allowed to take part in the IEP meeting if the parents can’t.
  • Taking part in the drafting of the IEP.
  • Placement outside the school district in another school. The child should be able to go to a public or private school, at public expense, if local schools do not have the right program.
  • Once a year review of placement.
  • Privacy and confidentiality of all records.

Parent’s rights under the IDEA

  • Take part in the review of your child’s IEP.
  • Agree to a time and place for those meetings.
  • Ask the local school agency to hold these meetings in your first language. You may also make special planning for any disability you or your spouse may have.
  • Give the okay before any review is conducted.
  • Receive a copy of the report.
  • Get separate testing of your child at public expense. This can be done if you have questions about the quality of the schools’ review. The school may ask for a hearing to decide the correctness of its own test.
  • Give written okay to any actions proposed for your child.
  • Get written notice of any proposed change to the IEP. You should also be told if the school refuses to make a change to the IEP that you asked for.
  • Come to and make comments at the annual public hearing. This is held for the state’s special education plan.
  • Check and if needed, dispute your child’s records. This is done in keeping with the Family Educational Rights Act.

Parents may also disagree and refuse consent to the actions listed below:

  • Fixing or changing items in your child’s files
  • Evaluating your child
  • Placing your child in a special education program
  • Getting more info from an outside source about your child
  • Giving info from the school to another person about your child
  • Changing the special program that your child is in
  • Taking your child out of the special program
By Haline Grublak, Vice President of Member and Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, C.R.S.S., C.P.R.S., Wellness & Recovery Program Manager, Beacon Health Options

Summary

A few of the IDEA principles:

  • A free and appropriate education
  • Individualized education plan (IEP)
  • Procedural safeguards

Before the 1960s, schools didn’t have to teach kids with disabilities until the Civil Rights Act was passed. It protects people who are part of a minority group. This includes people with disabilities. Now, all children have the right to get an education. One of the most important laws that protect children with disabilities is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

The IDEA principles

There are six IDEA principles that guide schools. They also guide how schools give and assess the special education services. These principles are:

  1. A free and appropriate education. Kids with disabilities are allowed to have a no cost education that is right for the child’s needs.
  2. An appropriate evaluation. Before a school can give education that is right for the child, a school must first find out what is right. They do this by testing the child. They measure the child’s abilities. This gives the school a clear picture of the child’s specific needs.
  3. Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The IEP assures that a child will get the right schooling. The IEP is a written plan. It lists the changes that need to be made in your child's school setting. These changes are planned to help him get the best education. It is put together by school staff, parents, and others who have the child’s best interests at heart. Sometimes, the child is also part of the planning. It is like a care plan or a treatment plan in a mental health setting. But, an IEP applies to your child’s schooling.
  4. Least restrictive environment. The IDEA ensures each child with a disability gets a free education. It needs to be in the least restrictive setting. The IEP process will help decide if the child is best served in the normal classroom. They may be better served in another school setting. It is the school’s duty to give an alternate setting.
  5. Parent and student participation in the IEP. This ensures the right of the student and the parents to be part of the IEP.
  6. Procedural safeguards. There are safeguards built into the law that protect the rights of parents and students. The school must tell the parent about any action it plans to take in planning the child’s IEP. Parents have the right to see all of their child’s records. There must be a process in place for parents to use to complain if there is a problem with the IEP.

IDEA is not meant to give care to children. It is a promise that the school will educate kids with disabilities. It is designed so that they can get the most from school.

To be able to have special education services, a child must have a disability. Not all mental health issues are seen as a disability. Only those mental health issues that get in the way of one or more life activities qualify. Contact ADA National Network (http://adata.org/) for more helpful info.

Rights under the IDEA

  • A free and fitting public education. This applies from the age of 6 through 18.
  • Access to the same types of programs and services that other children have.
  • Being placed in the least restrictive learning setting. This should be done, if possible, at the same school the child would normally go to.
  • Another learning setting, if going to a local public school is not possible.
  • Appointing a person to act as a parent proxy. This person should be allowed to take part in the IEP meeting if the parents can’t.
  • Taking part in the drafting of the IEP.
  • Placement outside the school district in another school. The child should be able to go to a public or private school, at public expense, if local schools do not have the right program.
  • Once a year review of placement.
  • Privacy and confidentiality of all records.

Parent’s rights under the IDEA

  • Take part in the review of your child’s IEP.
  • Agree to a time and place for those meetings.
  • Ask the local school agency to hold these meetings in your first language. You may also make special planning for any disability you or your spouse may have.
  • Give the okay before any review is conducted.
  • Receive a copy of the report.
  • Get separate testing of your child at public expense. This can be done if you have questions about the quality of the schools’ review. The school may ask for a hearing to decide the correctness of its own test.
  • Give written okay to any actions proposed for your child.
  • Get written notice of any proposed change to the IEP. You should also be told if the school refuses to make a change to the IEP that you asked for.
  • Come to and make comments at the annual public hearing. This is held for the state’s special education plan.
  • Check and if needed, dispute your child’s records. This is done in keeping with the Family Educational Rights Act.

Parents may also disagree and refuse consent to the actions listed below:

  • Fixing or changing items in your child’s files
  • Evaluating your child
  • Placing your child in a special education program
  • Getting more info from an outside source about your child
  • Giving info from the school to another person about your child
  • Changing the special program that your child is in
  • Taking your child out of the special program
By Haline Grublak, Vice President of Member and Family Affairs, Beacon Health Options
Reviewed by Trenda Hedges, C.R.S.S., C.P.R.S., Wellness & Recovery Program Manager, Beacon Health Options

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, assessments, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological, or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  

 

Close

  • Useful Tools

    Select a tool below

© 2023 Beacon Health Options, Inc.