What are Individual Education Plans (IEP)?

Reviewed Jun 22, 2021

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Summary

Included within the IEP:

  • A statement of the child’s current level of performance
  • Short-term steps to reach the annual goals
  • Description of the services to be provided

Each public school child who gets special education and related services must have an individualized education plan (IEP). Each IEP must be written for each student. It must be a truly personal document. The IEP creates a road map for teachers, parents, and school staff to work together. For children with disabilities, an IEP is the basis of a quality education.

The IEP meeting is when the child’s plan is drafted. The meeting is held with the child’s parents or caregivers. School staff comes as needed. Sometimes the child is also there. The meeting decides what special changes will be made in the child’s school setting. These changes will help her get more out of school.

What should be in the IEP?

  • The child’s current level of performance
  • Yearly goals
  • Short-term steps to reach the goals
  • The services to be given
  • How often the child will go to regular school programs
  • The expected date when services will start and how long the services will last
  • Standards for deciding if the goals been met
By Haline Grublak

Summary

Included within the IEP:

  • A statement of the child’s current level of performance
  • Short-term steps to reach the annual goals
  • Description of the services to be provided

Each public school child who gets special education and related services must have an individualized education plan (IEP). Each IEP must be written for each student. It must be a truly personal document. The IEP creates a road map for teachers, parents, and school staff to work together. For children with disabilities, an IEP is the basis of a quality education.

The IEP meeting is when the child’s plan is drafted. The meeting is held with the child’s parents or caregivers. School staff comes as needed. Sometimes the child is also there. The meeting decides what special changes will be made in the child’s school setting. These changes will help her get more out of school.

What should be in the IEP?

  • The child’s current level of performance
  • Yearly goals
  • Short-term steps to reach the goals
  • The services to be given
  • How often the child will go to regular school programs
  • The expected date when services will start and how long the services will last
  • Standards for deciding if the goals been met
By Haline Grublak

Summary

Included within the IEP:

  • A statement of the child’s current level of performance
  • Short-term steps to reach the annual goals
  • Description of the services to be provided

Each public school child who gets special education and related services must have an individualized education plan (IEP). Each IEP must be written for each student. It must be a truly personal document. The IEP creates a road map for teachers, parents, and school staff to work together. For children with disabilities, an IEP is the basis of a quality education.

The IEP meeting is when the child’s plan is drafted. The meeting is held with the child’s parents or caregivers. School staff comes as needed. Sometimes the child is also there. The meeting decides what special changes will be made in the child’s school setting. These changes will help her get more out of school.

What should be in the IEP?

  • The child’s current level of performance
  • Yearly goals
  • Short-term steps to reach the goals
  • The services to be given
  • How often the child will go to regular school programs
  • The expected date when services will start and how long the services will last
  • Standards for deciding if the goals been met
By Haline Grublak

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