Vacations Are Good for You

Reviewed Jan 26, 2017

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Summary

The psychological rewards of taking a vacation are so great that they can even improve your physical health.

Remember how you felt after your last vacation? If you were relaxed, rested, and energized, then you experienced the mental benefits of a well-earned break.
 
In fact, the psychological rewards of taking a vacation are so great that they can even improve your physical health. Research has shown that people who take annual vacations may live longer than those who can never “find the time.” By decreasing psychological stress, vacations promote good health.
 
Whether you go to the beach or to the mountains, to Europe or to Grandma’s, an annual holiday should be on your to-do list. If you’ve been putting off that trip, here’s a reminder of the mental and emotional benefits of taking a vacation:
 
Reducing stress
 
What do you do to relax? Thrill-seekers might consider a white-water rafting trip or ski weekend, while romantics may opt for a bed-and-breakfast stay. If you enjoy nature, a cabin in a nearby state park could be the perfect destination. Need help with ideas? Jot down a description of your fantasy vacation, then do research on possibilities that are within your budget.
 
Enhancing creativity
 
Most of us become more creative when we’re relaxed. Take a vacation, slow down, and innovate! You may come up with the perfect solution to a problem at work or home. You also can use your vacation as an opportunity to cultivate a new creative outlet—take a photography tour or a cooking class. Organized courses may last for a week or two and often are taught by top professionals.
 
Building relationships
 
A vacation is the perfect opportunity to spend time with family and friends. If you’re looking for a destination that will suit parents, teenagers, and children, consider a cruise. Cruises offer a range of exciting activities in a stress-free environment. If you’d like to focus on your spouse, leave the kids at home and check into an adults-only all-inclusive resort.
 
Studies show that regular vacations contribute to good health. They also provide an opportunity to spend time with loved ones, see a new place, or learn a new skill. Don’t put off something so important! Do a simple thing to improve the quality of your life—start planning your next vacation today.

By Lauren Greenwood
Source: Gump, Brooks B; Matthews, Karen A. Are Vacations Good for Your Health? The 9-Year Mortality Experience After the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Psychosomatic Medicine (2000) 62:608; United Nations International Labor Organization, www.ilo.org

Summary

The psychological rewards of taking a vacation are so great that they can even improve your physical health.

Remember how you felt after your last vacation? If you were relaxed, rested, and energized, then you experienced the mental benefits of a well-earned break.
 
In fact, the psychological rewards of taking a vacation are so great that they can even improve your physical health. Research has shown that people who take annual vacations may live longer than those who can never “find the time.” By decreasing psychological stress, vacations promote good health.
 
Whether you go to the beach or to the mountains, to Europe or to Grandma’s, an annual holiday should be on your to-do list. If you’ve been putting off that trip, here’s a reminder of the mental and emotional benefits of taking a vacation:
 
Reducing stress
 
What do you do to relax? Thrill-seekers might consider a white-water rafting trip or ski weekend, while romantics may opt for a bed-and-breakfast stay. If you enjoy nature, a cabin in a nearby state park could be the perfect destination. Need help with ideas? Jot down a description of your fantasy vacation, then do research on possibilities that are within your budget.
 
Enhancing creativity
 
Most of us become more creative when we’re relaxed. Take a vacation, slow down, and innovate! You may come up with the perfect solution to a problem at work or home. You also can use your vacation as an opportunity to cultivate a new creative outlet—take a photography tour or a cooking class. Organized courses may last for a week or two and often are taught by top professionals.
 
Building relationships
 
A vacation is the perfect opportunity to spend time with family and friends. If you’re looking for a destination that will suit parents, teenagers, and children, consider a cruise. Cruises offer a range of exciting activities in a stress-free environment. If you’d like to focus on your spouse, leave the kids at home and check into an adults-only all-inclusive resort.
 
Studies show that regular vacations contribute to good health. They also provide an opportunity to spend time with loved ones, see a new place, or learn a new skill. Don’t put off something so important! Do a simple thing to improve the quality of your life—start planning your next vacation today.

By Lauren Greenwood
Source: Gump, Brooks B; Matthews, Karen A. Are Vacations Good for Your Health? The 9-Year Mortality Experience After the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Psychosomatic Medicine (2000) 62:608; United Nations International Labor Organization, www.ilo.org

Summary

The psychological rewards of taking a vacation are so great that they can even improve your physical health.

Remember how you felt after your last vacation? If you were relaxed, rested, and energized, then you experienced the mental benefits of a well-earned break.
 
In fact, the psychological rewards of taking a vacation are so great that they can even improve your physical health. Research has shown that people who take annual vacations may live longer than those who can never “find the time.” By decreasing psychological stress, vacations promote good health.
 
Whether you go to the beach or to the mountains, to Europe or to Grandma’s, an annual holiday should be on your to-do list. If you’ve been putting off that trip, here’s a reminder of the mental and emotional benefits of taking a vacation:
 
Reducing stress
 
What do you do to relax? Thrill-seekers might consider a white-water rafting trip or ski weekend, while romantics may opt for a bed-and-breakfast stay. If you enjoy nature, a cabin in a nearby state park could be the perfect destination. Need help with ideas? Jot down a description of your fantasy vacation, then do research on possibilities that are within your budget.
 
Enhancing creativity
 
Most of us become more creative when we’re relaxed. Take a vacation, slow down, and innovate! You may come up with the perfect solution to a problem at work or home. You also can use your vacation as an opportunity to cultivate a new creative outlet—take a photography tour or a cooking class. Organized courses may last for a week or two and often are taught by top professionals.
 
Building relationships
 
A vacation is the perfect opportunity to spend time with family and friends. If you’re looking for a destination that will suit parents, teenagers, and children, consider a cruise. Cruises offer a range of exciting activities in a stress-free environment. If you’d like to focus on your spouse, leave the kids at home and check into an adults-only all-inclusive resort.
 
Studies show that regular vacations contribute to good health. They also provide an opportunity to spend time with loved ones, see a new place, or learn a new skill. Don’t put off something so important! Do a simple thing to improve the quality of your life—start planning your next vacation today.

By Lauren Greenwood
Source: Gump, Brooks B; Matthews, Karen A. Are Vacations Good for Your Health? The 9-Year Mortality Experience After the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. Psychosomatic Medicine (2000) 62:608; United Nations International Labor Organization, www.ilo.org

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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