Journal Writing Can Help Relieve Stress

Reviewed Jan 26, 2017

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Summary

  • Releases anxiety and tension
  • Recording thoughts helps escape pressures
  • It can handwritten, typed, etc.

While 24 hours may seem like a long amount of time, it quickly fills up with working (on average) eight hours a day, sleeping seven or eight hours a night, eating, running errands, cleaning, and spending time with loved ones. Often, there doesn’t seem to be enough time in the day for everything—and this can be very stressful.

After a taxing day, a great way to release anxiety and tension is to write in a journal. It doesn’t matter if you are a good writer or not—you are the only person who will be seeing your journal (unless you choose to share it with others).

Whether you put pen to paper or type on a computer, a journal offers a therapeutic way to collect your thoughts and ideas. Recording your thoughts—especially during a particularly stressful period—allows you to escape everyday pressures and worries.

Researchers have shown that writing about traumatic events has a beneficial effect on well-being. Setting aside even a short amount of time, like 10 to 15 minutes, to write in your journal about the stressors of the day, how they made you feel, and how you reacted to them, can help you relax. 

Organizing your journal writing

After a hectic and harried day, you don’t want to come home anxious to pour out your feelings, only to search a messy desk for a written journal or search through files on your computer hoping to locate the one that holds your journal entries. Here are some suggestions for organizing your journal writing:

Handwriting

  • Create a home for your journal. If possible, make this space close to where you like to write. If you carry your journal during the day, have a place to store it when you arrive home.
  • Have plenty of your favorite pens on hand. Store pens with your journal and remember to put them back each time you finish writing.

Keyboarding

  • On a computer, decide how to store your writing entries. Will you keep your entries on the computer's hard drive? Will you create a separate file for each entry, for each day (if you write more than one time a day) or for each month? Remember, the more files you create, the more organizing you will have to do.
  • Make a back-up copy of your journal entries in case your computer crashes and everything is lost. 

No rules

The most important thing: Don’t let your journal become a stress in itself. There are no rules for keeping a journal—if you don’t feel like writing each day, that’s OK. Also, you are not being graded for proper spelling or good grammar techniques. Writing in full sentences is not a requirement—sometimes just jotting down a fragment or quick thought is all you need.

Keeping a journal can be a fun way to learn about yourself—what stresses you and how to deal with that stress. Your journal-writing experience can be exactly what you make of it.

By Shauna Gellerman
Source: Writingthejourney.com, About.com (holistic healing)

Summary

  • Releases anxiety and tension
  • Recording thoughts helps escape pressures
  • It can handwritten, typed, etc.

While 24 hours may seem like a long amount of time, it quickly fills up with working (on average) eight hours a day, sleeping seven or eight hours a night, eating, running errands, cleaning, and spending time with loved ones. Often, there doesn’t seem to be enough time in the day for everything—and this can be very stressful.

After a taxing day, a great way to release anxiety and tension is to write in a journal. It doesn’t matter if you are a good writer or not—you are the only person who will be seeing your journal (unless you choose to share it with others).

Whether you put pen to paper or type on a computer, a journal offers a therapeutic way to collect your thoughts and ideas. Recording your thoughts—especially during a particularly stressful period—allows you to escape everyday pressures and worries.

Researchers have shown that writing about traumatic events has a beneficial effect on well-being. Setting aside even a short amount of time, like 10 to 15 minutes, to write in your journal about the stressors of the day, how they made you feel, and how you reacted to them, can help you relax. 

Organizing your journal writing

After a hectic and harried day, you don’t want to come home anxious to pour out your feelings, only to search a messy desk for a written journal or search through files on your computer hoping to locate the one that holds your journal entries. Here are some suggestions for organizing your journal writing:

Handwriting

  • Create a home for your journal. If possible, make this space close to where you like to write. If you carry your journal during the day, have a place to store it when you arrive home.
  • Have plenty of your favorite pens on hand. Store pens with your journal and remember to put them back each time you finish writing.

Keyboarding

  • On a computer, decide how to store your writing entries. Will you keep your entries on the computer's hard drive? Will you create a separate file for each entry, for each day (if you write more than one time a day) or for each month? Remember, the more files you create, the more organizing you will have to do.
  • Make a back-up copy of your journal entries in case your computer crashes and everything is lost. 

No rules

The most important thing: Don’t let your journal become a stress in itself. There are no rules for keeping a journal—if you don’t feel like writing each day, that’s OK. Also, you are not being graded for proper spelling or good grammar techniques. Writing in full sentences is not a requirement—sometimes just jotting down a fragment or quick thought is all you need.

Keeping a journal can be a fun way to learn about yourself—what stresses you and how to deal with that stress. Your journal-writing experience can be exactly what you make of it.

By Shauna Gellerman
Source: Writingthejourney.com, About.com (holistic healing)

Summary

  • Releases anxiety and tension
  • Recording thoughts helps escape pressures
  • It can handwritten, typed, etc.

While 24 hours may seem like a long amount of time, it quickly fills up with working (on average) eight hours a day, sleeping seven or eight hours a night, eating, running errands, cleaning, and spending time with loved ones. Often, there doesn’t seem to be enough time in the day for everything—and this can be very stressful.

After a taxing day, a great way to release anxiety and tension is to write in a journal. It doesn’t matter if you are a good writer or not—you are the only person who will be seeing your journal (unless you choose to share it with others).

Whether you put pen to paper or type on a computer, a journal offers a therapeutic way to collect your thoughts and ideas. Recording your thoughts—especially during a particularly stressful period—allows you to escape everyday pressures and worries.

Researchers have shown that writing about traumatic events has a beneficial effect on well-being. Setting aside even a short amount of time, like 10 to 15 minutes, to write in your journal about the stressors of the day, how they made you feel, and how you reacted to them, can help you relax. 

Organizing your journal writing

After a hectic and harried day, you don’t want to come home anxious to pour out your feelings, only to search a messy desk for a written journal or search through files on your computer hoping to locate the one that holds your journal entries. Here are some suggestions for organizing your journal writing:

Handwriting

  • Create a home for your journal. If possible, make this space close to where you like to write. If you carry your journal during the day, have a place to store it when you arrive home.
  • Have plenty of your favorite pens on hand. Store pens with your journal and remember to put them back each time you finish writing.

Keyboarding

  • On a computer, decide how to store your writing entries. Will you keep your entries on the computer's hard drive? Will you create a separate file for each entry, for each day (if you write more than one time a day) or for each month? Remember, the more files you create, the more organizing you will have to do.
  • Make a back-up copy of your journal entries in case your computer crashes and everything is lost. 

No rules

The most important thing: Don’t let your journal become a stress in itself. There are no rules for keeping a journal—if you don’t feel like writing each day, that’s OK. Also, you are not being graded for proper spelling or good grammar techniques. Writing in full sentences is not a requirement—sometimes just jotting down a fragment or quick thought is all you need.

Keeping a journal can be a fun way to learn about yourself—what stresses you and how to deal with that stress. Your journal-writing experience can be exactly what you make of it.

By Shauna Gellerman
Source: Writingthejourney.com, About.com (holistic healing)

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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