Creating Trust as a Couple

Posted Sep 29, 2017

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Summary

Ways to build trust include to share a secret, keep your promises, keep your partner’s confidences and, if your partner tells you something when he is feeling vulnerable, never to use that against him.

It’s easy to fall in love, but staying together requires work. One of the essential factors in strong, committed relationships is mutual trust. But trust doesn’t just happen; it has to be earned. 

Build trust through talking

Talking helps you reveal your character to your partner. Showing that you’re trustworthy requires that you:

  • Keep one another informed. Call or text if you’re going to be late. Communicate openly about issues that affect you singly or as a couple. Let your partner know when your child gets in trouble at school or a notice arrives because you forgot to pay a bill on time.
  • Fight fairly—don’t turn each other’s insecurities into ammunition. If you’re unhappy with your salary or your partner feels like a bad parent, don’t fling that back at each other during arguments.
  • Tell the truth. This should go without saying, but it’s not unusual for couples to tell each other lies to avoid getting into an argument—especially when it comes to spending money. Be upfront, always.
  • Share secrets. Everyone has something they’re ashamed of from their past. A willingness to talk about things you regret demonstrates that you have trust in one another and strengthens your bond.
  • Be supportive, especially when the other partner confesses something embarrassing or upsetting that happened.

Build trust through actions

Just as what you say can build trust, the things that you do also show your openness and reliability.

  • Keep your promises, big and small. From marriage vows to saying you’ll be home in time for dinner, promises should be kept.
  • Keep one another’s confidences. Your secrets should be safe with one another. Neither of you should talk to friends or others about your private conversations.
  • Either leave your cell phones unlocked or share your passwords with each other. Even if you never use one another’s cell phones, this shows you don’t have anything to hide.
  • Share a bank account. Money can be a huge source of tension among couples, so joint financial accounts will erase any doubt about how the other is spending money. 
By Sharron Luttrell, Military OneSource

Summary

Ways to build trust include to share a secret, keep your promises, keep your partner’s confidences and, if your partner tells you something when he is feeling vulnerable, never to use that against him.

It’s easy to fall in love, but staying together requires work. One of the essential factors in strong, committed relationships is mutual trust. But trust doesn’t just happen; it has to be earned. 

Build trust through talking

Talking helps you reveal your character to your partner. Showing that you’re trustworthy requires that you:

  • Keep one another informed. Call or text if you’re going to be late. Communicate openly about issues that affect you singly or as a couple. Let your partner know when your child gets in trouble at school or a notice arrives because you forgot to pay a bill on time.
  • Fight fairly—don’t turn each other’s insecurities into ammunition. If you’re unhappy with your salary or your partner feels like a bad parent, don’t fling that back at each other during arguments.
  • Tell the truth. This should go without saying, but it’s not unusual for couples to tell each other lies to avoid getting into an argument—especially when it comes to spending money. Be upfront, always.
  • Share secrets. Everyone has something they’re ashamed of from their past. A willingness to talk about things you regret demonstrates that you have trust in one another and strengthens your bond.
  • Be supportive, especially when the other partner confesses something embarrassing or upsetting that happened.

Build trust through actions

Just as what you say can build trust, the things that you do also show your openness and reliability.

  • Keep your promises, big and small. From marriage vows to saying you’ll be home in time for dinner, promises should be kept.
  • Keep one another’s confidences. Your secrets should be safe with one another. Neither of you should talk to friends or others about your private conversations.
  • Either leave your cell phones unlocked or share your passwords with each other. Even if you never use one another’s cell phones, this shows you don’t have anything to hide.
  • Share a bank account. Money can be a huge source of tension among couples, so joint financial accounts will erase any doubt about how the other is spending money. 
By Sharron Luttrell, Military OneSource

Summary

Ways to build trust include to share a secret, keep your promises, keep your partner’s confidences and, if your partner tells you something when he is feeling vulnerable, never to use that against him.

It’s easy to fall in love, but staying together requires work. One of the essential factors in strong, committed relationships is mutual trust. But trust doesn’t just happen; it has to be earned. 

Build trust through talking

Talking helps you reveal your character to your partner. Showing that you’re trustworthy requires that you:

  • Keep one another informed. Call or text if you’re going to be late. Communicate openly about issues that affect you singly or as a couple. Let your partner know when your child gets in trouble at school or a notice arrives because you forgot to pay a bill on time.
  • Fight fairly—don’t turn each other’s insecurities into ammunition. If you’re unhappy with your salary or your partner feels like a bad parent, don’t fling that back at each other during arguments.
  • Tell the truth. This should go without saying, but it’s not unusual for couples to tell each other lies to avoid getting into an argument—especially when it comes to spending money. Be upfront, always.
  • Share secrets. Everyone has something they’re ashamed of from their past. A willingness to talk about things you regret demonstrates that you have trust in one another and strengthens your bond.
  • Be supportive, especially when the other partner confesses something embarrassing or upsetting that happened.

Build trust through actions

Just as what you say can build trust, the things that you do also show your openness and reliability.

  • Keep your promises, big and small. From marriage vows to saying you’ll be home in time for dinner, promises should be kept.
  • Keep one another’s confidences. Your secrets should be safe with one another. Neither of you should talk to friends or others about your private conversations.
  • Either leave your cell phones unlocked or share your passwords with each other. Even if you never use one another’s cell phones, this shows you don’t have anything to hide.
  • Share a bank account. Money can be a huge source of tension among couples, so joint financial accounts will erase any doubt about how the other is spending money. 
By Sharron Luttrell, Military OneSource

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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