A Less-stressful Wedding

Reviewed Mar 17, 2017

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Summary

  • Stay organized.
  • Take care of your physical health.
  • Make time for your partner.

Congratulations! You’re getting married! Now you can begin planning the wedding of your dreams. Doing so is a lot of fun—but stressful too. Who hasn’t heard horror stories of brides-to-be gone berserk? Follow these tips to keep your sanity, sense of humor and friendships intact—and the big event in perspective. After all, the marriage is more important than the wedding.

Stay organized

Does it seem like there’s too much to do and too little time to do it? Whether planning for a small gathering or large event, the details can be overwhelming. Keeping organized is the best way to stay on top of what to do and when to do it. A successful organization system includes a:

  • “To-do” timeline
  • Method of compartmentalizing the different planning areas, such as rehearsal, reception catering, bridesmaid attire
  • System for tracking expenses and monitoring the wedding budget

Let go of perfection

Aspiring to be the “perfect” bride—with the “perfect” invitations, “perfect” dress, “perfect” cake, and so forth—will lead you to focus on what to do, rather than why, thereby robbing yourself from experiencing the rich emotions that come with this momentous occasion. Plus, satisfying family or other’s expectations for the perfect wedding will not be a true expression of you and your fiancé’s love for each other.

Although it’s important to stay on top of tasks as you count down to the big day, question your motives when making decisions. Ask yourself why it’s important to wear your grandmother’s traditional wedding gown if you really desire something more contemporary. Doing so will keep you from getting caught up in the quest for the “perfect” wedding, and instead, help you plan a memorable wedding that is perfect for you and your fiancé.

Listen to and fulfill emotional needs

Wedding hoopla can take a toll on your emotional health. You may be surprised by feelings of doubt, sadness, loss of control, and fear during the engagement period. After all, marriage not only represents a joyful union between two people, but also a break from your parents, your girlfriends, and your life as a single person. Also, divorce and dysfunctional family relationships can complicate or sour the planning process.

Turning your attention to your emotional needs is an important aspect of preparing for your wedding day. Find quiet times to put aside to-do lists and explore your innermost thoughts. Unwanted or uncomfortable feelings should be shared with someone willing to listen, or keep a diary. If you tune out such feelings during the planning period, you may be caught off guard during the rehearsal or reception, when pent-up emotions could get the best of you.

Also, keep in mind that family members, friends and even your fiancé may be experiencing wedding stress as well. Be thoughtful of how your wedding is affecting others.

Take care of physical health

Many brides-to-be survive on convenience food and caffeine. Eating right, getting enough sleep and exercise are vital to life balance—particularly during times of heightened stress.

  • Make an effort to eat nutritionally balanced meals. Drink lots of water and avoid drinking too much alcohol.
  • Go for a walk, a bike ride or to the gym. Exercise facilitates physical release of stress.

Find time for each other

Regularly put the wedding planner and bridal magazines aside. Go out for a romantic dinner or evening out. Have fun, laugh! But whatever you do, don’t talk about the big event. Prioritizing your relationship over your wedding will get your marriage off to the right start. 

By Christine P. Martin
Source: The Conscious Bride: Women Unveil Their True Feelings About Getting Hitched by Sheryl Nissinen, MA. New Harbinger Publications, 2000; The Balanced Bride: Preparing Your Mind, Body, and Spirit for Your Wedding and Beyond by Leah Ingram. Contemporary Books, 2002.

Summary

  • Stay organized.
  • Take care of your physical health.
  • Make time for your partner.

Congratulations! You’re getting married! Now you can begin planning the wedding of your dreams. Doing so is a lot of fun—but stressful too. Who hasn’t heard horror stories of brides-to-be gone berserk? Follow these tips to keep your sanity, sense of humor and friendships intact—and the big event in perspective. After all, the marriage is more important than the wedding.

Stay organized

Does it seem like there’s too much to do and too little time to do it? Whether planning for a small gathering or large event, the details can be overwhelming. Keeping organized is the best way to stay on top of what to do and when to do it. A successful organization system includes a:

  • “To-do” timeline
  • Method of compartmentalizing the different planning areas, such as rehearsal, reception catering, bridesmaid attire
  • System for tracking expenses and monitoring the wedding budget

Let go of perfection

Aspiring to be the “perfect” bride—with the “perfect” invitations, “perfect” dress, “perfect” cake, and so forth—will lead you to focus on what to do, rather than why, thereby robbing yourself from experiencing the rich emotions that come with this momentous occasion. Plus, satisfying family or other’s expectations for the perfect wedding will not be a true expression of you and your fiancé’s love for each other.

Although it’s important to stay on top of tasks as you count down to the big day, question your motives when making decisions. Ask yourself why it’s important to wear your grandmother’s traditional wedding gown if you really desire something more contemporary. Doing so will keep you from getting caught up in the quest for the “perfect” wedding, and instead, help you plan a memorable wedding that is perfect for you and your fiancé.

Listen to and fulfill emotional needs

Wedding hoopla can take a toll on your emotional health. You may be surprised by feelings of doubt, sadness, loss of control, and fear during the engagement period. After all, marriage not only represents a joyful union between two people, but also a break from your parents, your girlfriends, and your life as a single person. Also, divorce and dysfunctional family relationships can complicate or sour the planning process.

Turning your attention to your emotional needs is an important aspect of preparing for your wedding day. Find quiet times to put aside to-do lists and explore your innermost thoughts. Unwanted or uncomfortable feelings should be shared with someone willing to listen, or keep a diary. If you tune out such feelings during the planning period, you may be caught off guard during the rehearsal or reception, when pent-up emotions could get the best of you.

Also, keep in mind that family members, friends and even your fiancé may be experiencing wedding stress as well. Be thoughtful of how your wedding is affecting others.

Take care of physical health

Many brides-to-be survive on convenience food and caffeine. Eating right, getting enough sleep and exercise are vital to life balance—particularly during times of heightened stress.

  • Make an effort to eat nutritionally balanced meals. Drink lots of water and avoid drinking too much alcohol.
  • Go for a walk, a bike ride or to the gym. Exercise facilitates physical release of stress.

Find time for each other

Regularly put the wedding planner and bridal magazines aside. Go out for a romantic dinner or evening out. Have fun, laugh! But whatever you do, don’t talk about the big event. Prioritizing your relationship over your wedding will get your marriage off to the right start. 

By Christine P. Martin
Source: The Conscious Bride: Women Unveil Their True Feelings About Getting Hitched by Sheryl Nissinen, MA. New Harbinger Publications, 2000; The Balanced Bride: Preparing Your Mind, Body, and Spirit for Your Wedding and Beyond by Leah Ingram. Contemporary Books, 2002.

Summary

  • Stay organized.
  • Take care of your physical health.
  • Make time for your partner.

Congratulations! You’re getting married! Now you can begin planning the wedding of your dreams. Doing so is a lot of fun—but stressful too. Who hasn’t heard horror stories of brides-to-be gone berserk? Follow these tips to keep your sanity, sense of humor and friendships intact—and the big event in perspective. After all, the marriage is more important than the wedding.

Stay organized

Does it seem like there’s too much to do and too little time to do it? Whether planning for a small gathering or large event, the details can be overwhelming. Keeping organized is the best way to stay on top of what to do and when to do it. A successful organization system includes a:

  • “To-do” timeline
  • Method of compartmentalizing the different planning areas, such as rehearsal, reception catering, bridesmaid attire
  • System for tracking expenses and monitoring the wedding budget

Let go of perfection

Aspiring to be the “perfect” bride—with the “perfect” invitations, “perfect” dress, “perfect” cake, and so forth—will lead you to focus on what to do, rather than why, thereby robbing yourself from experiencing the rich emotions that come with this momentous occasion. Plus, satisfying family or other’s expectations for the perfect wedding will not be a true expression of you and your fiancé’s love for each other.

Although it’s important to stay on top of tasks as you count down to the big day, question your motives when making decisions. Ask yourself why it’s important to wear your grandmother’s traditional wedding gown if you really desire something more contemporary. Doing so will keep you from getting caught up in the quest for the “perfect” wedding, and instead, help you plan a memorable wedding that is perfect for you and your fiancé.

Listen to and fulfill emotional needs

Wedding hoopla can take a toll on your emotional health. You may be surprised by feelings of doubt, sadness, loss of control, and fear during the engagement period. After all, marriage not only represents a joyful union between two people, but also a break from your parents, your girlfriends, and your life as a single person. Also, divorce and dysfunctional family relationships can complicate or sour the planning process.

Turning your attention to your emotional needs is an important aspect of preparing for your wedding day. Find quiet times to put aside to-do lists and explore your innermost thoughts. Unwanted or uncomfortable feelings should be shared with someone willing to listen, or keep a diary. If you tune out such feelings during the planning period, you may be caught off guard during the rehearsal or reception, when pent-up emotions could get the best of you.

Also, keep in mind that family members, friends and even your fiancé may be experiencing wedding stress as well. Be thoughtful of how your wedding is affecting others.

Take care of physical health

Many brides-to-be survive on convenience food and caffeine. Eating right, getting enough sleep and exercise are vital to life balance—particularly during times of heightened stress.

  • Make an effort to eat nutritionally balanced meals. Drink lots of water and avoid drinking too much alcohol.
  • Go for a walk, a bike ride or to the gym. Exercise facilitates physical release of stress.

Find time for each other

Regularly put the wedding planner and bridal magazines aside. Go out for a romantic dinner or evening out. Have fun, laugh! But whatever you do, don’t talk about the big event. Prioritizing your relationship over your wedding will get your marriage off to the right start. 

By Christine P. Martin
Source: The Conscious Bride: Women Unveil Their True Feelings About Getting Hitched by Sheryl Nissinen, MA. New Harbinger Publications, 2000; The Balanced Bride: Preparing Your Mind, Body, and Spirit for Your Wedding and Beyond by Leah Ingram. Contemporary Books, 2002.

The information provided on the Achieve Solutions site, including, but not limited to, articles, quizzes, and other general information, is for informational purposes only and should not be treated as medical, health care, psychiatric, psychological or behavioral health care advice. Nothing contained on the Achieve Solutions site is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for consultation with a qualified health care professional. Please direct questions regarding the operation of the Achieve Solutions site to Web Feedback. If you have concerns about your health, please contact your health care provider.  ©2017 Beacon Health Options, Inc.

 

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